Russian: Cake “Napolean”

In Russian literature, a cake named Наполеон (Napoleon) is first mentioned in the first half of the 19th century. The cake has enjoyed an especially great popularity since the centenary celebration of the Russian victory over Napoleon in the Patriotic War of 1812. During the celebrations in 1912, triangular-shape pastries were sold resembling the bicorne. The many layers of the cake should symbolize La Grande Armée. The top is covered by pastry crumbs which should symbolize the snow of Russia which helped the Russians defeat Napoleon. Later, the cake became a standard dessert in the Soviet cuisine. Nowadays, the Napoleon remains one of the most popular cakes in Russia and other post-Soviet countries. It typically has more layers than the French archetype, but the same height.

Ingredients : 500 g flour , 250 g margarine , 1 ea egg , 1 tb vinegar . Icing: 1 sugar , 0,5 l milk , 2 ea eggs , 2 tb flour , 200 g butter , vanilla.

 

Method:

Icing: Mix sugar, eggs, flour and then pour over milk. Cook on low heat, stirring regularly, until dense. When icing cools down a little, add butter and vanilla.

Dough: cut margarine into small pieces and toss with flour until smooth. Mix egg, vinegar in 1 cup of water and add it to flour. Knead the dough until elastic and smooth. Divide the dough into 8 parts and put in the fridge for 40-60 minutes. Roll out every part very thin, put in a baking form, cut out remains, pierce with a fork and bake in a preheated oven until light golden. Bake the remains of dough until golden colour.
Spread the icing on every shortcake and on the top. Crumb the dough remains and sprinkle all the cake with them. Puy in a fridge at least for a couple of hours.

See Many recipes for Russian desserts and foods at:http://www.waytorussia.net/WhatIsRussia/RussianFood/Desserts.html

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