Dream Kitchen from “Something’s Gotta Give”

I am convinced that acclaimed writer, producer and director Nancy Meyer’s is a foodie.  There is a scene in the film where Diane Keaton is washing produce and I fell in love with the cinematography in that brief clip.  With such attention to even that detail, I knew she was a foodie.  Take a look and maybe get inspired at the kitchen use for Something’s Gotta Give.

 

Image from Fanpop

Click to See other Dream Kitchens from Movies

National Chocolate Cake Day

National Chocolate Cake Day is celebrated every year on January 27th. The origins of the day are unknown—but there is some speculation that a dessert company or perhaps a cake enthusiast started it.  The main ingredients that make up a chocolate cake are flour, sugar, cocoa, eggs, and milk. TRY THIS RECIPE

Alternatively, pre-packaged cake mix can be purchased;  or for more sophisticated bakers, you can find advanced recipes for cake such as the delicious. chocolate ripple cake 

Chocolate cakes are part of a 742 million dollar a year international industry. Sales of chocolate cakes have increased year after year since recording of the industry by product began in 1994. READ MORE

Taco Bell fights lawsuit with ‘truth’ ads about its beef

PORTLAND, Oregon — Taco Bell launched an advertising campaign Friday to fight back against a lawsuit charging its taco filling isn’t beef.

The fast-food chain placed full-page print ads in Friday’s editions of USA TODAY, the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and other newspapers as well as online to “set the record straight,” company President Greg Creed said.

The print ads say, in huge letters, “Thank you for suing us. Here’s the truth about our seasoned beef.” They go on to outline the ingredients. The chain did not say how much it is spending on the campaign, but such ads in national newspapers can cost more than $100,000 each. READ MORE

South Indian: Milk Appam Recipe

Milk Appam is a South Indian breakfast food made from rice flour and coconut. Appam, (Tamil: அப்பம்,ஆப்பம், Malayalam:  pronounced [apːam]), or hoppers, are a type of food in Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Sri Lankan cuisine. It is called chitau, Pitha in Oriya, Paddu or Gulle Eriyappa in Kodava and Appam in Telugu. It is known as Appa in Sinhala. It is eaten most frequently for breakfast or dinner.  You may also find Milk Appam mix in a box at any local Indian grocery store.

Ingredients for Milk Appam:

* 1 cup Rice flour
* 1/2 cup grated coconut
* 50g sugar
* 1 pinch salt
* 3 cardomom
* oil for frying
Directions for making Milk Appam:

1. Grind coconut and take the milk.
2. Heat 1 cup of water and when it comes to boil, add the rice flour to make a paste.
3. To this, add the coconut milk, sugar, salt and cardomom and mix to the consistency of Dosai batter.
4. With a spoon, pour one by one in oil and fry.
5. Turn it over in oil until it is fully cooked.
6. Enjoy your Milk Appam. Hope you love this Indian recipe.

Click Here For More Indian Breakfast Recipes

Republic Day in India

Many people throughout India celebrate the nation’s Republic Day, which is a gazetted holiday on January 26 each year. It is a day to remember when India’s constitution came into force on January 26, 1950, completing the country’s transition toward becoming an independent republic.

What do people do?

Much effort is put towards organizing events and celebrations that occur on Republic Day in India. Large military parades are held in New Delhi and the state capitals. Representatives of the Indian Army, Navy and Air Force and traditional dance troupes take part in the parades.

A grand parade is held in New Delhi and the event starts with India’s prime minister laying a wreath at the Amar Jawan Jyoti at India Gate, to remember soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their country. India’s president takes the military salute during the parade in New Delhi while state governors take the military salutes in state capitals. A foreign head of state is the president’s chief guest on Republic Day.READ MORE

Japan: About Grilled Unagi(Eel)

Grilled unagi is a relatively expensive delicacy in Japan, prized not only for its flavor but also for its legendary stamina-giving properties. It’s traditionally eaten during the hottest part of the summer (on the “Day of the Ox” on the lunar calendar) to provide strength and vitality for the rest of the year. READ MORE

5 Tips for a Quick and Easy Workout for Busy Moms

As a working mother with a very demanding schedule and a child, working out on a regular basis seems to be an impossible task. In fact, trying to get enough sleep each day is challenging enough without having to think about hitting the gym or taking a yoga class, that is why I’m always looking for ways to be efficient while getting the most out of my hectic day. If you are in the same predicament, here are five quick and easy tips for busy moms (and dads too), to get some daily exercising without having to go to the gym. READ MORE TIPS

How to Make Frozen Hot Chocolate

Frozen Hot Chocolate was made popular by the restaurant Serendipity 3 in Manhattan, NY and by the popular romantic movie, Serendipity.  There’s no romanticizing the fact that this treat is true chocolate decadence.   Try this recipe:

Ingredients

  • 3oz of Chocolate Chips
  • 2 tsp of hot chocolate mix
  • 1.5 table spoons of sugar or sweeten to taste
  • 1.5 Cups of Milk
  • 3 Cups of Ice
  • Whip Cream
  • Chocolate Shavings

Directions

Mix all the dry ingredients in with melted chocolate chips in a bowl  except for whip cream and shavings.  Add 1/2 cup milk into the mixture.  Pour 1 cup of milk into the blender.  Add the chocolate mixture. Pour chocolate mixture into the blender.  Add the ice then blend.   Pour into serving glass of choice top with whip cream and shavings.

*Note an economical solution would be to use all chocolate milk powder mix instead of chips.  Serendipity 3 uses powder instead of melted chips in their version of the recipe.

European Cultural Heritages of Wisconsin

Food Prep Methods- oldworldwisconsin.wisconsinhistory.org

New Glarus (Swiss) and Mt. Horeb (Norwegian) are examples of rural towns that reflect the traditions of the original residents’ homeland. An emphasis on historic preservation is evident in logging towns and mining communities that have maintained the flavor of the past. With the greatest number of Native American tribes and bands east of the Mississippi, there are Native American powwows, arts and crafts exhibitions, and museums. Few states in the nation have maintained cultural ties with their European ancestors as diligently as Wisconsin. From the ornate German restaurants of Milwaukee to the Swiss cheese factories of Green County to the Scandinavian attractions of Door County, Wisconsin’s European heritage is proudly on display, providing visitors with a fascinating glimpse of the state’s ethnic heritage.

Read More about the German Heritage in Wisconsin

Read More about the Scandinavian Culture of Wisconsin

Read More about the Swiss Culture of Wisconsin

The History of the Casserole

casserole, from the French for “saucepan”, is a large, deep dish used both in the oven and as a serving vessel. The word casserole is also used for the food cooked and served in such a vessel, with the cookware itself called a casserole dish or casserole pan. In British English, this type of dish is frequently also called a bake, coinciding with the cooking techniqueused to cook casseroles.

The casseroles we know today are a relatively modern invention. Early 18th century casserole recipes consisted of rice that was pounded, pressed, and filled with a savoury mixture of meats such as chicken or sweetbreads. Some time around the 1870s this sense of casserole seems to have slipped into its current sense. Cooking in earthenware containers has always been common in most nations, but the idea of casserole cooking as a one-dish meal became popular in America in the twentieth century, especially in the 1950s when new forms of lightweight metal and glassware appeared on the market. By the 1970s casseroles took on a less-than sophisticated image.

*Info from Wikepedia