Easter all Around the World

Blessing of Easter Food in Poland

Blessing of Easter Food in Poland

Easter is celebrated all around the world, whether it is celebrated with a big family dinner, religious parade, or hunting for Easter eggs. Different countries celebrate Easter in their own way. In this article the four countries that will be highlighted are Brazil, Russia, Egypt, and France. These four countries all celebrate Easter through games, religious activities, and food.

 

In Brazil Easter is known as Pa’scoa. The beginning of Pa’scoa celebrationstarts off with Semana Santa (Holy week). During Holy week, processionals are in full swing, banners and signs are made to celebrate Mary and the body of Jesus. During the processional, pacoca is handed out to all the visitors. Pacoca is like a candy, which is made from a mixture of crushed nuts and sugar made into a paste. On Good Friday

Paoca

Paoca

bacalhau is made and eaten. Bacalhau is dried and salted cod; this piece of fish is traditionally eaten on holidays.

Easter in Russian is celebrated in different religions but food is the main attraction.  In Russian kulich is made in celebration of Easter and is eaten 40 days after Easter. Kulich is a tall and narrow bread made from butter, eggs, candied fruit, raisins, and nuts. Kulich is usually iced on top like a cake and decorated. Usually served with kulich, paskha is a Russian cheesecake made from curd cheeses and is formed in the shape of a pyramid. Many dishes are made in Russian in celebration of Easter including beet salads, lapsha soup,ham in the dough, and dranikl (potato pancake).

(Russian Kulich)

Brazil and Russia are not the only ones that celebrate Easter, Egypt bakes up it’s own traditional Easter meals too.  In Egypt the Easter celebration begins with Sham el Nessin that is translated as “smelling of the breeze”. The Sham el Nessin celebrations run into the Easter celebration. During the celebrations certain foods are consumed such as slated fish, onions, beans, lettuce, and colored eggs. The main attraction of the celebrations is the baked breads. The baked bread that is very traditional is Armenian Choreg, which is sweet bread. Armenian Choreg has a secret ingredient and that is mahleb, which are ground sour cherry pits. This bread takes patients to make but the pay off of its sweet taste is rewarding enough.

kulich

kulich

France is the mother land of Culinary greatness, and in France Easter showcases that. In France after the child have played all the Easter egg games and have gone to church it then would be time for the Easter meal. The traditional Easter meal in France would consist of several courses, which are accompanied by wine, cheese, and dessert. The main course would be a braised, herb rubbed rack of lamb. After the main course a smaller more delicate course would be served such as a salad. Following that course, cheeses and baguettes would be shared around and then a delightful chocolate dessert. Speaking of chocolate, Easter eggs in France aren’t plastic they are chocolate made by chocolatiers and patissiers.

So as we can see Easter is celebrated all around the world just in different flavors. Brazil, Russia, Egypt, and France all celebrate Easter but some eat salted fish, tall narrow breads, sweet breads made with sour cherry pit, and make chocolate eggs. Once again we see that food can bring people together no matter what the occasion is, so get in touch with you heritage and celebrate this Easter with a traditional meal.

 

Work Cited

  • Abissada. “The Egyptian Kitchen.” : Sham El Nessim / Easter: Armenian Choreg (brioche). N.p., 22 Apr. 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Brazilian Easter from Around the World at EasterBunny’s.Net.” Brazilian Easter from Around the World at EasterBunny’s.Net. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Easter Traditional Food from Around the World.” Easter Traditional Food from Around the World. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Flavors of Brazil: The Foods of Easter in Brazil – Salt Cod (Bacalhau).” Flavors of Brazil: The Foods of Easter in Brazil – Salt Cod (Bacalhau). N.p., 25 Mar. 2010. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • Hanson, Rachel. “How Do the French Celebrate Easter.” LoveToKnow. M.A. French, n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • Kubilius, Kerry. “Easter In Russia.” About.com Eastern Europe Travel. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • Laurena. “Easter in Brazil.” Portuguese Blog. N.p., 8 Apr. 2012. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Traditional Russian Easter Foods.” The Hungarian Girl. N.p., 9 Mar. 2010. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
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