Film and Foodie Review: War Room

War Room Poster

The Film: If you are Christian this a film that may renew your faith and if you agnostic you might find real hope.  War Room is a faith based film by the successful producer, the Kendrick brothers.  This dynamic duo have created small budget films with the hope of providing a bigger picture for people.  War Room is the next in a series films including Fireproof, Facing the Giants or Courageous by the Kendrick brothers.

War Room on a basic level is about a couple with marital problems but when they both dig deeper they find that they are more than war with each other.  Prayer is the the much needed weapon to save their lives.  This is a very touching film.  I witnessed people pull out tissue and wipe their eyes.  It is a great family film.  The movie features as the lead actress, Priscilla Shirer Christian Inspirational teacher/speaker.  How does she fair in the acting departing?  She does pretty well for her first crack at this.  Having seen the movie twice, I can recognize the lack of range in expression at times.  Nevertheless, the movie doesn’t suffer for it.- Review by Crystal A. Johnson

Click for Peanut Butter Hot Fudge Sundae

The Food:  Well, this film provides us with two great options.  When in theaters, make sure you go to a coffee house or an ice cream shop because you may find yourself with plenty to talk about.

Classic Lentil Soup Recipe

I’ve e always loved Lentil Soup. It’s always been a favorite of mine. There’s something so comforting about it… It started lentil-soup-2out during my childhood years when I’d come home from school and my mom would have a can of Progresso Lentil Soup piping hot and ready for me and my sister.

I like the sultry crisp bite of the lentils, the hearty bite of the potatoes, the smooth tangy bite of the spinach and finally the hot warm broth with the underlying taste of the smoky cumin….. wow! I kinda sound real profesh writing like that! I’m even surprising myself!

Although my beloved Progresso soup did not have the taste or depth that the one I make now does… it did open my eyes to what this marvelous soup could be.

Now my son asks me for this delicious soup when he comes home from school!

It’s good, it’s hearty, it’s inexpensive to make and is almost a meal in itself! Make a little mixed green salad on the side and you have a fantastic dinner any night!  -Contributor- Michelle Karam – Feb 2010

Ingredients

I’ve e always loved Lentil Soup. It’s always been a favorite of mine. There’s something so comforting about it… It started out during my childhood years when I’d come home from school and my mom would have a can of Progresso Lentil Soup piping hot and ready for me and my sister.

I like the sultry crisp bite of the lentils, the hearty bite of the potatoes, the smooth tangy bite of the spinach and finally the hot warm broth with the underlying taste of the smoky cumin….. wow! I kinda sound real profesh writing like that! I’m even surprising myself!

Although my beloved Progresso soup did not have the taste or depth that the one I make now does… it did open my eyes to what this marvelous soup could be.

Now my son asks me for this delicious soup when he comes home from school!

It’s good, it’s hearty, it’s inexpensive to make and is almost a meal in itself! Make a little mixed green salad on the side and you have a fantastic dinner any night!

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion finely chopped
  • 2 large carrots finely chopped
  • 3 stalks of celery finely chopped
  • 2 potatoes cut into small cubes
  • ½ red bell pepper finely chopped
  • 2 cups fresh spinach or 1 cup frozen chopped spinach
  • 2 cups brown lentils, rinsed and picked thru
  • 1 tomato chopped
  • ¼ cup plain tomato sauce
  • 2 quarts chicken or vegetable stock
  • ½ teaspoon cumin

Directions

Heat the olive oil in a large pot and add onion, carrot, celery and pepper. Allow to sweat or cook on the stovetop until the onions are translucent or you can see thru them. About 5 minutes. Add the lentils, potatoes, tomatoes, tomato sauce and seasonings and allow to cook on a med-low simmer for about one hour. Add spinach and cook for 10 more minutes.

Drizzle with a little more olive oil on top… mmmmm!!!!

Optional Ingredients

  • ½ cup uncooked small pasta shells
  • ½ cup diced smoked ham (that will be added when the vegetables are sweating in the oil)
  • 1 sausage diced or sliced – spicy chicken sausage is excellent!
  • ½ cup canolini beans
  • ½ cup croutons – add upon serving

La Feria de Los Moles – 8th

The most important folkloric event in Los Angeles, The 8th Edition of ‘La Feria de Los Moles’ (Mole Fair), brings more flavor and delicious mole this year from Puebla & Oaxaca.

This delicious event includes a special presentation on the origin of the famous mole, which is one of Puebla & Oaxaca’s main dishes, a delicious and fun gastronomic debate amongst judges from the Mexican states known for their mole, and tastings of the different mole styles for all in attendance. Which mole do you like the most?mole

On October 4, La Placita Olvera will once again witness this celebratory feast filled with flavor and featuring an array of delicious moles that go from sweet to salty and hot. This year, for the first time an array of delicious pastries and other dishes will be prepared right along with mole, the unique star of the event.. Mole is a dish that originated from the collision of indigenous and Spanish cultures in Mexico.

You are invited to join the flavor of an event that brings together a record assistance of over 30,000 people of all ages, generations and cultures, offering more than 13 different Mexican moles to enjoy.

The delicious event starts at 10:00 a.m. and lasts until 7:00 pm. taking place at Olvera St., Los Angeles. Entrance is free and dishes are available for purchase.

 

Pulitzer Prize-winning Los Angeles Times food critic Jonathan Gold speaks about Feria de Los Moles (2012):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=MkJfW0AWUMc

Los Angeles: First Official Oktoberfest celebration

Chef Mairinger grew up at the Oktoberfests in his Austrian homeland – “It’s where I had my first beer –Oktoberfest Hat 2 (don’t ask how old I was).  I was also a champ at all the midway games and love the crazy hats.” 
Come celebrate Oktoberfest at BierBeisl Imbiss with traditional entertainment and authentic food and drink:  oversized beers, giant pretzel, pork shanks + spaetzle, beer flights, Austrian donuts, sweet and savory knoedels, sausages (of course) and more….all served on festive tables in The Spring Arcade, in the heart of downtown LA’s historic core.  Prizes for best lederhosen and best dirndl and best hat.
 
Date:  Saturday October 10 and Sunday October 11    Time:  11 am – 2 am
Tickets available thru EventBrite 
Ticket Price:  $30 includes entertainment, 10 oz beer, pretzel and official BierBeisl Oktoberfest T-Shirt.
Special donation tickets available to benefit Alex’s Lemonade Stand, an organization formed to fight childhood cancer.  For VIP ticket information and reservations, contactoffice@bierbeisl-imbiss.com
 

Cuban Influence on Miami

Image from http://www.etraveltrips.com/

written by Catrina Sally

The influx of Miami’s Cuban population began in the 1950’s. Following the rise of Fidel Castro, many Cuban refugees fled to Florida. Over 150,000 Immigrants travelled by plane and by boat to Miami. Welcomed into the city with opened arms, the refugees morphed Miami into “Little Havana.”

The cultural effect of the Cuban population is readily visible in Miami.  The people of Cuba have influenced the clothing, music, architecture, and food of the Florida city.  You can see, hear, and taste their influence in everything from the funky salsa music to the mint and rum laden Mojito.

Like most cultures, food is an important aspect of the Cuban Community. Cuban food is characterized by its heavy use of rice. Popular dishes include arroz con pollo (chicken and rice), pan con bistec (steak sandwich), platanos maduros (sweet plantains), and lechon asado (pork).

Watch People Try Cuban Food For the First Time:

Check out some the Cuban Recipes we have hear at MCCN

https://multiculturalcookingnetwork.wordpress.com/category/latino-foodcomida/cuban/

Or Visit

Visit http://icuban.com/

PAN FRIED ANGEL HAIR PASTA WITH SHRIMP

Image not by Chef Bonilla Image from http://www.biggirlssmallkitchen.com/

This Recipe is by Chef Jesus Bonilla

Ingredients

1 CUP TRADITIONAL FISH STOCK

3 TABLESPOONS EXTRA – VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

2 OUNCES MONKFISH, CUT INTO ¾ INCH CUBES

¼ POUND ANGEL HAIR PASTA BROKEN INTO 1 INCH PIECES

1 GARLIC CLOVE, PEELED AND VERY FINELY CHOPPED

3 TABLESPOONS SOFRITO

SALT TO TASTE

8 MEDIUM SHRIM, PEELED, DEVEINED AND CUT INTO ¾ INCH PIECES

¼ CUP ALLIOLI

Directions

Bring the stock to a boil in a small saucepan, once it boils, reduce the heat and maintain it at simmer.

In a medium flameproof casserole, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over high heat. Add the monkfish and sear on all sides, about 2 minutes. Remove the fish and set it aside.

Reduce the heat to medium – low, and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and the pasta. Pan fry , stirring it continuously with a wooden spoon, until the pasta has a golden brown color, about 10minutes. Be careful not to burn the pasta. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Then add the sofrito and raise the heat to medium pour in the hot stock and add salt to taste.

Add the shrimp and the seared monkfish pieces, and stir with a wooden spoon. You’ll see the pasta absorbing the liquid. Don’t touch the pan anymore. Cook for 6 minutes, until the liquid has evaporated.

Remove the pan from the heat and let the rossejat rest for 3 minutes.  Serve immediately with the allioli on the side.

Allioli Recipe

Recipe by Chef Jesus Bonilla

Photo from Tastespotting

Allioli (pronounced: [ˌaʎiˈɔɫi], also spelled alioli [ˌaɫiˈɔɫi]), from all i oli, Catalan for “garlic and oil”, is a typical paste-like cold sauce of Catalonia, Balearic Islands and Valencia. It is made by pounding garlic with olive oil and salt in a mortar until smooth. It is often served with arròs a banda from Alicante, with grilled lamb, grilled vegetables and arròs negre, and comes in other varieties such as allioli de codony (allioli with boiled quince, not the preserve) or allioli with boiled pear.

1 SMALL EGG

1 CUP EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

1 GARLIC CLOVE, PEELED

1 TEASPOON SHERRY VINEGAR OR FRESH LEMON JUICE

SALT TO TASTE

Break the egg into a small mixing bowl. Add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the garlic clove, and the vinegar or lemon juice. Using a hand – held electric mixer, mix at high speed until the garlic is fully pureed into a loose paste. Then little by little add the remaining olive oil as you continue blending at high speed. If the mixture appears too thick when you begin adding the oil, add 1 teaspoon water to loosen the sauce. Continue adding the oil and blending until you have a rich, creamy allioli. The sauce will be a lovely yellow color. Add salt to taste.

Ceviche Recipe

Ceviche 2 michelle

Ceviche.  Almost anyone that’s ever been to a Latin country will tell you they’ve had it.  For those of you that don’t know what Ceviche is let me give you a teeny bit of  back ground on it… it is basically raw seafood or shellfish that is “cooked” in lime, lemon, orange or even grapefruit juice.  It’s typically thought of as a Peruvian dish but it’s prevalent in most Latin American countries and each one has their own twist on it.  From Mexico to Ecuador, Philippines to Panama…. everyone’s got their own spin on this fresh fish dish.

I have issues with Ceviche though.  It’s sort of a love hate kinda thing.  I absolutely love the idea of raw seafood being cooked or macerated in lime juice, but can’t stand cilantro!  Yes, I know… It’s an absurd thing not to like, but I’m not alone in my distain for cilantro, or so I’d like to think! And well, most ceviche is made with it.  So I’ve got a fair compromise… I don’t order it in restaurants and make it myself and make just my portion with out it.  My husband tells me every time I’m not getting the “true” ceviche experience but hell, I’m ok with that!

I’m not quite sure where or what region you’d say mine is from… I take a little bit from here and a little bit from there, but I do know one thing… it’s YUM! (even with out cilantro!) For the sake of argument today, I made mine with cilantro! So ceviche enthusiasts there you have it!

I hope you enjoy this recipe!

 

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of firm fresh red snapper
  • (cut into small ½ inch pieces)
  • ½ pound bay shrimp
  • ½ pound bay scallops
  • ½ cup fresh squeezed lime juice
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • ½ of each-red & yellow bell pepper finely diced
  • ½ red onion finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • ½  jalapeno finely diced
  • ½ bunch cilantro chopped
  • Pinch of Cayenne or Tabasco

Directions

In a glass pyrex bowl (do not use aluminum, it is reactive and will discolor the fish as it’s macerating) place the all the ingredients together and give it a gentle mix.  Cover and place in the refrigerator and allow to sit for at least one hour.  Remove after an hour give it a more through stir and put it back into the fridge for at least another hour or two…. the longer the fish is exposed to the citrus acid, the tastier it’s going to be and it will absorb the all of the flavors.

**sidenote**

The fish will turn color while it’s marinating.  It will start off as a pink raw looking color and slowly turn into a white opaque color.

ceviche photo by Michelle

It can sit for up to 24 hours before serving!

Chopped avocado is fantastic in this dish as well!

Serve individually in martini glasses with some tostada shells on the side!

Recipe contributed by Michelle Karam

Fusilli e Arugula Pignoli

Contributed by Michelle Karam

Luscious grains. Vibrant fruits and vegetables. Smooth velvety cheeses. Deep rich Olive Oils.  Sensory overload? No, just 2297950the abundant cuisine of the Mediterranean.  Not only is this cuisine a feast for your eyes and seriously delicious, but it turns out after all it’s provides those that follow it with some of the highest life expectancies around the world.  This is a lifestyle and a diet that provides all of the pleasures but none of the guilt!

So what exactly are the regions that this cuisine hails from? Traditionally it’s from Greece, but as it’s popularity has emerged you’ll find recipes from parts of Italy, Spain, Portugal, southern France and even Turkey, Morocco and the Middle East.

The warm sun, the fragrant sea, the azure sky… a taste of the Mediterranean. These recipes are a little bit of all of that. Now that’s a lifestyle that I wanna live.

 Ingredients

½ cup pignoli (or pine nuts)

4 cloves garlic

1 bunch arugula

1/3 cup olive oil

Coarse sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1 pound fusilli

Directions

 

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

 

In a skillet pan toast the pignoli nuts.  The nutty aroma from oils will begin to be released. Toast to a warm golden brown.

 

Then add pignoli nuts & garlic to the blender to form a paste.  Add the arugula and olive oil and pulse into the pignoli mixture.  The perfect texture you’re going to be looking for will be gritty and grainy, keeping the integrity of the pine nuts.

 

Add the fusilli to the water and cook until al dente.  Drain pasta and add Arugula Pignoli mixture and give it a stir to combine.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

The simplicity of this dish is perfectly Mediterranean all the while keeping that balance of healthy, astonishingly easy and fresh.

Blackeyed Peas Cookup

Image from soulfoodandsoutherncooking.com

Blackeyed Peas Cookup

Recipe by Grace Oliver
Ingredients
3 lb boneless chicken thigh (or whatever meat you like)
2 lb medium shrimp (optional)
1 medium onion
½ bunch green onions
4 cloves garlic (or 2 tsp garlic powder)
3 tbsp soya sauce (optional)
Hot pepper to taste
5 sprigs of thyme
1/2 cup of chopped parsely
1/4 tsp blackpepper
2 medium tomatoes
2 boulion cubes (chicken flavor)
2 tsp Goya Adobo
2 cans blackeyed peas
2 stalks of celery with lots of leaves(diced)
1 sweet red pepper (optional but looks good)
4 tbsp oil
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
2½ cups rice (parboiled or jasmine)
1 coconut or (1 can coconut milk)
3 cups of water

Preparation
Cut up the chicken into bite size pieces (about 12), and wash with either lime or lemon juice or vinegar.
Drain as much of the liquid as possible. Add all the seasoning and marinate for at least 1 hour, although the
longer the better. If left overnight then refrigerate. Heat the oil over med-high heat until very hot.
Add sugar and watch very carefully keeping the meat, pot spoon, pot cover or splatter screen handy.
When the sugar is very dark brown (caramelized), add the meat carefully and stir to brown all pieces.
Try to squeeze out any liquid from the meat so as to avoid a big splash, and to allow the meat to fry rather
than boil. Turn the heat to med-low and let the meat fry for about 5 minutes, turning frequently.
Wash the rice and add to the meat and stir fry this for about 1 min. Add the rest of the ingredients and
fry for another minute. Add 3 cups of water and bring the pot to a boil. Turn heat down to low and cook covered.
Check the pot after about 8-10 mins. and turn it making sure its not dried out yet. If necessary, add a little water.
When the rice is tender remove cover and turn the heat off. Let it sit for a few minutes and stir it up a little to
allow it to dry out a bit. Serve with the usual sliced cucumbers, tomatoes, lettuce, watercress etc.