Manhattan Clam Chowder Recipe

Clam Chowder originated in the Eastern United States, but is now commonly served in manhattanclamchowder21restaurants throughout the country, particularly on Fridays when American Catholics traditionally abstained from meat. Many regional variations exist, but the two most prevalent are New England or “white” clam chowder and Rhode Island / Manhattan or “red” clam chowder.

Introduction of the Tomato – Tomato-based clam chowders came about with the new-found popularity of the tomato in the mid-1800s and the large population of Italians in New York and the Portuguese fishing communities of Rhode Island.  By the 1930s, this tomato version had come to be called Manhattan clam chowder.

Check out this recipe:

Ingredients

  • 15 ounce (425 g) canned potatoes, or 2 small boiled potatoes
  • 28 ounce (794 g) canned tomatoes in juice, or 2 large tomatoes and tomato juice
  • 6.5 ounce (184 g) canned chopped clams, minimum
  • 2 stalks of celery

Procedure

  1. Core the tomatoes. Remove the pale parts and the seeds; the “meat” of the tomato will be what will be used. For canned tomatoes, a strainer will be helpful.
  2. Chop all non-clam ingredients to match the clams in size.
  3. Optionally add spices. Suggestions offered include dill seedbasilthymecelery seedtarragonmarjoram, and/or fresh cilantro. Alternatively, oregano can be used in lieu of the marjoram.
  4. Cook the chowder, without boiling, till the celery begins to soften.

 

Bananas Foster, A New Orleans Original Dessert Recipe

 

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Bananas Foster is an American dessert that originated in New Orleans made with cooked bananas served in a butter, brown sugar and rum sauce.

In 1951, with ever an eye for publicity and the promotion of his city, Owen Brennan challenged his chef Paul Blangé to create a dish featuring the fruit.  The dramatic, flambéed result is now the most-ordered item on Brennan’s menu; it is not unusual for guests who have dined elsewhere to arrive just for a dessert of Bananas Foster.

The dish was named for Richard Foster, a friend of Owen Brennan and the chairman of the New Orleans Crime Commission, on which Brennan served.  See the Original Recipe from Brennans.

The New Orleans dessert of bananas Foster inspired this riff on a classic banana cream pie. It features a layer of rum-spiked sautéed bananas under the traditional pudding filling, plus a brown sugar-mascarpone cream topping.  See Recipe

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 A staple at the French Quarter’s legendary Brennan’s restaurant since 1951, bananas Foster is New Orleans in dessert form: bananas, butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, vanilla ice cream, and rum, set afire for both taste and spectacle.

Bananas Foster at Stanley’s Restaurant, New Orleans.   Bananas Foster is a popular dessert for tourist to try and a number of restaurants offer it.

 

A Canadian Favorite: Poutine

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Poutine is a dish that includes french fries and cheese curds topped with a brown gravy. It originated in the Canadian province of Quebec and emerged in the late 1950s in the Centre-du-Québec area. It has long been associated with Quebec cuisine.

Annual poutine celebrations occur in MontrealQuebec City, and Drummondville, as well as TorontoOttawa, and Chicago. Today, it is often identified as a quintessential Canadian food. It has been called “Canada’s national dish“, though some believe this labelling represents a misappropriation of Québécois culture. Many variations on the original recipe are popular, leading some to suggest that poutine has emerged as a new dish classification in its own right, as with sandwiches and dumplings

Food Truck Wednesdays in Maryland

Hooray for Wednesdays! Yay! Fun! Fun! Fun! 

Why the cheers for the week’s “get over the hump day?” Well, it’s because in Maryland, there are tantalizing tastes just waiting to be discovered at Food Truck Wednesdays. This fiesta of food happens every Wednesday from spring to the end of October at the Arbutus Volunteer Fire Department in Arbutus, MD and Red Lion Hotel’s parking lot in Timonium, MD. 

The food trucks include all kinds of scrumptious local and international cuisine including: soul-food, Greek, Mexican, Korean, Indian and even dessert trucks. Here are just some of the food trucks who frequent the event:

  • The Gypsy Queen
  • Greek on the Street
  • Beef on the Street
  • Wanna Pizza This
  • Kommie Pig
  • Jimmy’s Famous Seafood
  • Farm to Charm
  • Mexican on the Run
  • Deja Roux

The Multi Cultural Cooking Network had the opportunity to catch up with one of the founders of the event, Chad Houck of H2 Markets. What a chat! We talked to him about the origins of the event, how the trucks are selected and what to expect in the coming months. Check out the interview above, and find out more information about Food Truck Wednesdays by going to FoodTruckNites.com.

Photo and video provided by Foundation Media Services

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Eat your food on the run at Food Truck Wednesdays. Here is a Korean Beef BBQ Wrap from the Gypsy Queen food truck

 

 

Texas born Deep Fried Twinkie Recipe

A deep-fried Twinkie involves freezing the cake, dipping it into batter, and deep frying it to create a variation on the traditional snack cake. The deep-fried Twinkie was influenced by the deep-fried Mars bar, a variation of said chocolate bar, which was invented in Stonehaven, Scotland.

Deep Fried Twinkie cropped

 

The Texas State Fair had introduced the fried Twinkie to great popular acclaim, and the notion spread to other state fairs across the U.S., as well as some establishments that specialize in fried foods. Fried Twinkies are sold throughout the U.S. in fairs, as well as ball games.Preparation

Although variations exist in the form, the deep-fried Twinkie is usually prepared with a batter intended for fish, typically consisting of flour, egg, and vinegar. Prior to dipping, a wooden or plastic stick is often inserted through one end (to allow the consumer to hold it), and the Twinkie is then frozen overnight to prevent melting while being deep fried. After coating, conventional cooking oil is typically used, although beef suet or tallow is sometimes used to give a meaty flavor.

When prepared formally, the deep-fried Twinkie is usually topped with powdered sugar and accompanied by a fruit dipping sauce

*Info from Wikepedia

As of 6/1/14

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United States: History of White House Executive Chefs

Executive Chef Cristeta Comerford

The White House Executive Chef is responsible for the planning, managing and preparing of all menus and meals for the First Family and their private entertaining, and official state functions at the White House, the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States.

The executive chef heads the three White House kitchens, a staff of four sous-chefs, and reports directly to the chief usher. The executive chef works with the First Lady, Chief Usher, White House Social Secretary and the Executive Pastry Chef to plan menus for State Dinners, receptions, and day-to-day non-official meals. The executive chef officially serves at the president’s pleasure but more commonly works with the first lady, and is appointed, or reappointed, by each administration.

The executive chef holds no purview over any of the desserts or pastries served at the White House. The executive pastry chef operates as a separate entity, but coordinates with the executive chef for all meals and events.

The current White House executive chef is Cristeta Comerford, the first woman to be selected for the post. She was born in the Philippines.  Her cooking style is American, French and Ethnic:

Listing of White House Executive Chefs:

  • Rene Verdon 1961-1965
  • Henry Haller 1966-1987
  • Jon Hill 1987-1988
  • Hans Raffert 1988-1990
  • Pierre Chambrin 1990-1994
  • Walter Scheib 1994-2005
  • Cristeta Comerford 2005-present

*Info from Wikepedia

History and Pecan Pie Plus Recipe

Claims have been made of the dish existing in the early 1800s in Louisiana, but this does not appear to be backed up by recipes or literature.[3] Attempts to trace the dish’s origin have not found any recipes dated earlier than 1886,[4] [5] and well-known cookbooks such as Fannie Farmer and The Joy of Cooking did not include this dessert before 1940.

Click to See Recipe

Chocolate Banana Pudding Recipe

Recipe creation of Crystal A. Johnson, Multiculturalcookingnetwork.com Editor©

Forgive me Patsy Mae(Mom), my first experience with Banana Pudding I did not like.  Yuck, to put it mildly.  I am not a fan of texture of bananas.  I will refrain sharing my thoughts on bananas but this recipe is for the banana lover.  A friend of mine would bring her very sweet banana pudding to my annual Christmas party every year.  It was always the biggest hit.  The secret ingredients of it success kept under lock and key until her family member let her not it was not so secret then she shared the secret of this sweet pudding.

As restaurant critic, I am privy to some pretty innovative takes on comfort food these days so I thought I would take some liberties with the southern American classic dessert by entering chocolate into the equation.  Hold on choco-holics.  We are talking chocolate fudge and chocolate covered pretzels.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of chocolate pretzel rounds
  • 1 large Box of Banana Pudding or 2 small boxes
  • 3 to 4 Bananas
  • 1 can of condensed milk
  • 2 8oz containers of whip cream or do a homemade equivalent
  • Chocolate Fudge syrup

Directions

You can follow the box directions for a few deviations.  If you love the classic vanilla wafer then don’t let me stand in the way.  Layer bottom of glass sheet pan or bowl with whole chocolate covered preztels.  Then layer sliced banana to your liking.    Add  to your pudding mix about two or three splashes of condensed milk.  Then pour Chocolate fudge syrup over the very top of the pudding mixture.    Crumbled two handfuls of chocolate covered pretzel and place in sandwich bag.  Seal then use a rolling pin to crumble.  Pour crumble pretzels on top.   Enjoy.