Tikoy Recipe

Tikoy or Nian gao is snown as Chinese New Year pudding, the Nian gao is made up of glutinous rice flour, wheat starch, salt, water, and sugar. The colour of the sugar used determines the colour of the pudding (white or brown). Tikoy or Nian Gao is considered as a centerpiece during Chinese New Year in the Philippines.

Read more: http://www.pinoyrecipe.net/special-tikoy-recipe/#ixzz2J2ZayJLN

There’s More Than Action That Meets the Eye with Chinese Actress Yu Nan

Born in Dalian, Yu Nan studied at the Beijing Film Academy, where she graduated in 1999. The Beijing Film Academy is the Harvard of film schools.  Her feature film debut, in Lunar Eclipse (1999), which earned her the Best Actress of the Deauville Asian Film Festival, started her career working with several of China’s Sixth-Generation film directors. She subsequently starred in three more films with Wang Quan’an: Jingzhe (2003), which earned her the Best Actress Golden Rooster Award and the Best Actress prize of the Paris International Film Festival in 2003; Tuya’s MarriageGolden Bear in 2007 at the Berlin International Film Festival for which she won the Best Actress prize from the Chicago International Film Festival[citation needed]; and Weaving Girl (2009), which won Jury Special Grand prix and the FIPRESCI prize from the 2009 Montreal World Film Festival.  If seems to be a running theme, yes she is a stellar actress.  

Getting to play alongside Hollywood legendary action stars in the bigger and better Expendables 2 (SEE Review) could be a great break for the actress in the American film scene.   Moreover, she is fluent in MandarinFrench, and English.

How to Set the Table

Table manners play an important part in making a favorable impression. They are visible signals of the state of our manners and therefore are essential to professional success. The point of etiquette rules is to make you feel comfortable – not uncomfortable.

Use the silverware farthest from your plate first.

Here’s the Silverware and dinnerware rule:  Eat to your left, drink to your right. Any food dish to the left is yours, and any glass to the right is yours.

Starting with the knife, fork, or spoon that is farthest from your plate, work your way in, using one utensil for each course. The salad fork is on your outermost left, followed by your dinner fork. Your soup spoon is on your outermost right, followed by your beverage spoon, salad knife and dinner knife. Your dessert spoon and fork are above your plate or brought out with dessert. If you remember the rule to work from the outside in, you’ll be fine.(READ MORE For American & Continental/European Style)

Korean Table Setting

Rice, soup, a spoon and chopsticks are arranged from left to right, in that order for each person. Stews and side dishes are placed in the center to be shared by all.

Korean use a spoon to eat rice, soup and stews and chopsticks for rather dry side dishes, but the spoon and chopsticks are not used simultaneously. Koreans also do not hold their bowls or plates while eating. When the meal is over, the spoon and chopsticks are placed back down on the table.(READ MORE)

Chinese Table Place Setting includes:

  • a rice bowl
  • chopsticks
  • Chinese porcelain soup spoon
  • plate which is placed under the bowl and serves as a bone/discard plate
  • smaller sauce dish for a dipping sauce
  • tea cup

(Click Here to Learn about Chinese Dining & Etiquette)

Chinese New Year 2011

Spring Festival, also known as Chinese New Year, is the most important traditional festival in China. It begins on the first day of the first lunar month (usually in late January or early February) and ends on the 15th day of the first lunar month (Lantern Festival).

Chinese New Year is a time for families to be together. Celebrations include having annual reunion dinner on Chinese New Year’s Eve, setting firecrackers, giving lucky money to children, ringing the New Year bell, sending Chinese New Year greetings, dragon and lion dancing, and Niu Yangge (traditional dance in northern China). READ MORE

Interview with Glee Star Harry Shum Jr.

Image from Poptower.com

MCCN’s Erika L. Holmes does an Exclusive interview with  the hot dance star and series cast member of Glee, Harry Shum Jr. He took some time out his busy schedule to answer many questions including his culture, favorite foods, dance background and of course about Glee.  He is now best known as Mike Chang, the mysteriously dialogue-less “Other Asian” on Glee.

Click Here For Interview – See Dance off video with Shum and Matthew Morrison

Green Tea Ice Cream Recipe

(Photo from Japan Guidebook)

Green tea ice cream has a smooth delicious flavor.  Like Vanilla is not a strong flavored ice cream. However, the ice cream featured in the photo is matcha (green tea) ice cream, which is stronger than green tea ice cream in the United States. Green tea originates from China.

Ingredients

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoons dry green tea
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 vanilla pod
  • 1 1/4 cups double (heavy) cream
  • 1/4 cup caster sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons boiling water

DirectionsTake the dry green tea and soak in boiling water with the tablespoon of sugar for 10-12 minutes.

Into a saucepan put the vanilla pod and milk and gently bring to the boil then pour this over the tea. Leave to stand for 5 or 6 minutes.

Beat the egg yolks with the 1/4 cup caster sugar in a separate bowl and then strain the milk mixture into it.

Transfer to a saucepan and gently heat, stirring all the time, until the mixture is thick. Leave to cool. Whip the double (heavy) cream and fold into the cooled tea mixture. Transfer the complete mixture into an ice cream maker and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

*For More Ice Cream Recipes Visit: http://www.ice-cream-recipes.com

Learn more about ice cream flavors of Japan in Japan Guidebook

 

Teaching Kids about Asian Multi-Culturalism Through Food

Sunni Boswell of the Asian Express, teaches middle school children in the segment below about Asian Fruits.  This lesson provokes children to identify different Asian countries which helps the children to recognize the diversity of Asian cultures.

How to Make Chinese Meat Buns/Nikuman

Nikuman (肉まん; derived from 肉饅頭 niku (meat) manjū) is a Japanese food made from flour dough, and filled with cooked ground pork or other ingredients. It is a kind of chūka man (中華まん lit. Chinese-style steamed bun) similar to the Chinese baozi (包子), Also known in English as pork buns.

Nikuman are steamed and often sold as street food. From about August or September, through the winter months until roughly the beginning of April, Chūka man are available at convenience stores, where they are kept hot. -(Wikepedia)

For More on Asian Recipes and Food History Visit: http://multiculturalcookingnetwork.com/regions/asia.html

Chinese Figure Skaters Shen Xue and Zhao Hongbo Win the Gold

Out of Retirement and onto the medal stand:

Chinese duo wins pairs competition figure skating.

 

Retirement is a word that is tossed around a lot in sports these days. For Shen Xue and Zhao Hongbo, it meant nothing when their country asked them to return to the winter Olympics. At age 31 and 36 respectively, Shen and Zhao have won the gold for China in the first instance since 1960 of a Russian or Soviet pair has not earned the top spot. The couple has two bronze medals to their names from the two past Olympics, but it seems the third time is a charm.

 

The final free skate program started with the bronze medalists Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy less than a point behind Shen and Zhao. The Chinese couple skated a mistake free program and earned the gold. Finishing with the silver medal was the other Chinese pairing of Pand Qing and Tong Jian who won the gold in 2006.    

Article by Michael Fusco

About Chinese Potstickers & Recipe

Guotie (simplified Chinese: 锅贴; traditional Chinese: 鍋貼; pinyin: guōtiē; literally “pot stick”) is pan-fried jiaozi, also known as potstickers in North America. They are a Northern Chinese style dumpling popular as a street food, appetizer, or side order in Chinese . This dish is sometimes served on a dim sum menu, but may be offered independently. The filling for this dish usually contains pork (sometimes chicken, or beef in Muslim areas), cabbage (or Chinese cabbage and sometimes spinach), scallions (spring or green onions), ginger, Chinese rice wine or cooking wine, and sesame seed oil.

An alternative method is to steam in a wok and then fry to crispness on one side in a shallow frying pan.

Guotie are shallow-fried in a wok (Mandarin ‘guo’). A small quantity of water is added and the wok is covered. While the base of the dumplings is fried, the upper part is steamed and this gives a texture contrast typical of Chinese cuisine.

Exactly the same dumpling is boiled in plenty of water to make jiaozi and both are eaten with a dipping sauce.

Three or five folds are made on one side of the round wrapper that is rolled so that the edges are thinner than the middle. This gives the base a large surface area that helps to give the dumpling stability to stand up in the pan.

The Chinese method of preparing the dough is to pour boiling water onto the flour and letting stand for five minutes and then adding a small quantity of cold water. This helps to activate the gluten in the dough. (Wikepedia)

For the filling:

  • 2/3 pound ground beef (preferably chuck) or lamb, coarsely chopped to loosen
  • 2/3 cup chopped Chinese chives or scallions (white and green parts)
  • 1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons finely minced fresh ginger (use 2 tablespoons for lamb)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1/3 cup chicken stock or water
  • 2 tablespoons light (regular) soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sesame oil

To form and cook:

See Instructions