How to Make Creme Brûlée

Crème brûlée or crème brulée, also known as burned cream, burnt cream or Trinity cream, and virtually identical to the original crema catalana, is a dessert consisting of a rich custard base topped with a layer of hardened caramelized sugar.

Crème brûlée is usually served in individual ramekins. Discs of caramel may be prepared separately and put on top just before serving, or the caramel may be formed directly on top of the custard immediately before serving. To do this, sugar is sprinkled onto the custard, then caramelized under a red-hot salamander (a cast-iron disk with a long wooden handle) or with a butane torch.[10]

There are two methods for making the custard. The more common creates a “hot” custard by whisking egg yolks in a double boiler with sugar and incorporating the cream, adding vanilla once the custard is removed from the heat. Alternatively, the egg yolk/sugar mixture can be tempered with hot cream, then adding vanilla at the end. In the “cold” method, the egg yolks and sugar are whisked together until the mixture reaches ribbon stage. Then, cold heavy cream is whisked into the yolk mixture followed by vanilla. It is then poured into ramekins and baked in a bain-marie.

A Taste of Jeni’s Sorbet

Dairy-free, gluten-free and guilt free is what you get to experience with Jeni’s sorbet. She has multiple flavors including banana, lemon and even a Frosé. I sampled the frosé. I was looking for a hint rosé. Instead the exoerience resembled the taste of a mouth full of frozen strawberries. Rosé is listed in the ingredients. Jeni’s sells pints and mini 3.6 fluid ounce containers.

Ms. Dot’s Poundcake Recipe: Featured on HGTV’s Hometown

The hit show Hometown on HGTV made not only fans excited but folks with southern roots excited by featured recipe by a local by the name of Ms. Dot.

Ingredients

  • All purpose flour – 3 cups
  • Sugar – 3 cups
  • Six eggs
  • Butter – 3 sticks
  • 8 oz. cream cheese
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt
Ms. Dot Sharing Recipe

And Whatever you do, don’t preheat that oven – Oh no, no no!

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Love Hometown? Thinking of moving to Laurel, Mississippi and don’t mind being featured on the show? Contact hometowncasting@rtrmedia.com

Film and Foodie: The Irresistible Candy, Turkish delight

In the hit Marvel series Falcon and the Winter Soldier, the villain zemo offers up what he describes as irresistible Turkish delight candy. Zemo tempts a child into giving him answers.

Turkish delight was also used to tempt a child in Chronicles of Narnia. Boy, these candies must be something else. MCCN decided to learn more about this candy.

Turkish delight or lokum is a family of confections based on a gel of starch and sugar. Premium varieties consist largely of chopped dates, pistachios, hazelnuts or walnuts bound by the gel; traditional varieties are often flavored with rosewater, mastic, Bergamot orange, or lemon. The confection is often packaged and eaten in small cubes dusted with icing sugar, copra, or powdered cream of tartar.

History of Chess Pie and How to Make it

According to James Beard‘s American Cookery (1972), chess pie was brought from England originally and was found in New England as well as Virginia.[2] A recipe similar to chess pie appears in Martha Washington’s Booke of Cookery, from the mid-18th century. A recipe for chess pie appeared in the 1877 cookbook by Estelle Woods Wilcox, Buckeye Cookery.

Chess pie is most commonly associated as a dessert of the American South. Common types of chess pie are buttermilk, chocolate, lemon, and nut.

The origin of the name chess pie is unknown, but many theories have been proposed. It could be a derivation of “cheese pie”, the combination of eggs, butter, and sugar making a custardlike filling that is similar in texture to British cheesecakes and lemon curd;  it could be named after the town of Chester, England;  it could be from a piece of furniture used prior to home refrigeration called a “pie chest“, in which pies were stored; or it could have come from a mangling of “It’s just pie”/”It’s jes’ pie”

Ingredients

The basic chess pie recipe calls for the preparation of a single crust and a filling composed of flour, butter, sugar, and eggs. Some variations call for the addition of cornmeal as a thickener. Many recipes call for an acid such as vinegar, buttermilk, or lemon juice.

Watch How to Make Chess Pie

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Baker’s Passion Becomes Her Business

Pastry chef, Jalisa Harris is enjoying her decision to have faith and open One Bite, LLC. It’s her very own baking business serving the DMV area (D.C., MD, VA.). MCCN talks to her about her business and passion for baking in our new series, The Cool Culture Cook. READ MORE

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PECAN PIE RECIPE

Claims have been made of the dish existing in the early 1800s in Louisiana, but this does not appear to be backed up by recipes or literature.

According to the Oxford Companion to Food, the pecan, a member of the hickory tree family, is the most important native nut of North America, and its native habitat is the central southern region of the US. The name pecan comes from the Algonquin Indian word paccan, which denoted hickories, including pecans. In fact, the Algonquins used pecans to make a concoction called “hickory milk” which consisted of crushed pecans and boiling water, which was then strained and used in recipes as a thickener and/or a seasoning.

How the pecan found its way into a pie is a whole ‘nother muddled story. Mostly the Louisiana French lay claim to this pie, but there’s some suggestion that the Texas Germans (recreating nusstorte) were the first to make it, where recipes were in print as early as 1886. But the pecan pie didn’t make it to the mainstream until the wife of a corporate sales exec at Karo created the popular Karo Syrup version in the 1930s. By the 1940s, the pie started appearing in cookbooks such as the The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and the Joy of Cooking, and today it ranks as one of the most popular pies in the States.

Read more: http://blog.webicurean.com/2012/11/25/classic-kahlua-pecan-pie/#ixzz75GeitIW2

Ingredients:

1 CUP OF PECAN HALVES

1 BASIC PIE CRUST, UNBAKED

1 EGG + 3 EGG WHITES

1 CUP OF LIGHT CORN SYRUP

1/3 CUP OF PACKED DARK BROWN SUGAR

FULL RECIPE —> HTTPS://CANUSTILLHEARME.NET/PECAN-PIE-RECIPE/

or Watch MCCN’s Editor’s Recipe:

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Pumpkin Roll Recipe

The earliest published reference for a rolled cake spread with jelly was in the Northern Farmer, a journal published in Utica, New York, in December 1852. Called “To Make Jelly Cake”, the recipe describes a modern “jelly roll” and reads: “Bake quick and while hot spread with jelly. Roll carefully, and wrap it in a cloth. When cold cut in slices for the table.”

The terminology evolved in America for many years. From 1852 to 1877 such a dessert was called: Jelly Cake (1852), Roll Jelly Cake (1860), Swiss Roll (1872), Jelly Roll (1873), and Rolled Jelly Cake (1876). The name “Jelly Roll” was eventually adopted.

Ingredients:

3 LARGE EGGS, SEPARATED
1 CUP SUGAR, DIVIDED
2/3 CUP CANNED PUMPKIN
3/4 CUP ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR
1 TEASPOON BAKING SODA
1/2 TEASPOON GROUND CINNAMON

FULL RECIPE –> HTTPS://CANUSTILLHEARME.NET/PUMPKIN-ROLL-RECIPE/

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