Baltimore: Tea by Julia Faye

Going to tearooms is hard work, but somebody’s has to do it, and by George I take my job seriously. So, when I looked online and found a little tea spot located in a historic property called Stone Mansion, I was very intrigued. There happened to be a Christmas tea coming up—all the more intriguing. So I come upon the property of this quaint little spot and I’m greeted by Julia Faye Briggs, owner of the Tea by Julia Faye. She is friendly like your Auntie Julia who’s always trying to make sure your comfortable at her home. As she bustles around getting things ready for the Christmas tea,  I’m making myself comfortable amongst the various Victorian pieces, checking out the beautiful tea pots and other paraphenalia. Yes, this is going to be a good visit. READ MORE

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How to Set the Table

Table manners play an important part in making a favorable impression. They are visible signals of the state of our manners and therefore are essential to professional success. The point of etiquette rules is to make you feel comfortable – not uncomfortable.

Use the silverware farthest from your plate first.

Here’s the Silverware and dinnerware rule:  Eat to your left, drink to your right. Any food dish to the left is yours, and any glass to the right is yours.

Starting with the knife, fork, or spoon that is farthest from your plate, work your way in, using one utensil for each course. The salad fork is on your outermost left, followed by your dinner fork. Your soup spoon is on your outermost right, followed by your beverage spoon, salad knife and dinner knife. Your dessert spoon and fork are above your plate or brought out with dessert. If you remember the rule to work from the outside in, you’ll be fine.(READ MORE For American & Continental/European Style)

Korean Table Setting

Rice, soup, a spoon and chopsticks are arranged from left to right, in that order for each person. Stews and side dishes are placed in the center to be shared by all.

Korean use a spoon to eat rice, soup and stews and chopsticks for rather dry side dishes, but the spoon and chopsticks are not used simultaneously. Koreans also do not hold their bowls or plates while eating. When the meal is over, the spoon and chopsticks are placed back down on the table.(READ MORE)

Chinese Table Place Setting includes:

  • a rice bowl
  • chopsticks
  • Chinese porcelain soup spoon
  • plate which is placed under the bowl and serves as a bone/discard plate
  • smaller sauce dish for a dipping sauce
  • tea cup

(Click Here to Learn about Chinese Dining & Etiquette)