Baltimore Beer Week

There has never been a more exciting time in American Brewing history – the movement from National to local, from mass produced to hand crafted and from quantity to quality can be seen in every segment of today’s beer market place.  Several beer related celebrations will be going on (Find out Dates and More) including Oktoberfest.

The Brewer’s Association of Maryland is proudly hosting the 11TH Anniversary of Maryland Brewer’s Oktoberfest at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. This lively festival will include beer gardens featuring over 120 beers from twenty-two local Maryland breweries, delicious German foods, live bands, exciting contests, Oompah bands and much more.

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National Peanut Festival, Dothan, Alabama

Approximately half of the peanuts grown in the United States are grown within a 100-mile radius of Dothan, Alabama. The National Peanut Festival (NPF) — the nation’s largest peanut festival — is held each fall to honor peanut growers and to celebrate the harvest season. The fairgrounds are located on Highway 231 South — just three miles south of the Ross Clark Circle.  The festivities include numerous fun-filled family events, such as amusement rides, animal acts, agricultural displays, live concertsbeauty pageants, arts & crafts displays, contests, food, a two-hour parade, of course, tons of peanuts! Come join us! www.nationalpeanutfestival.com/

Peanuts

Oktoberfest Around the World

Germany is the forefather of the popular celebration but countries around the world have decided to join the fun.  Some of the listed events have come and gone but knowing they say is half the battle so put it on the calendar for next year.  Check out how the world celebrates Oktoberfest:

globemap

Fremont Oktoberfest, Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood, Washington, USA

September 18-20, 2009

Oktoberfest re-creations are the most common in the US, so for the tenth recommendation we head back to American soil, but this time we’re going to the west coast. Fremont’s festival has some very unique aspects that go way beyond your average Oktoberfest offerings; the Texas Chainsaw Pumpkin Carving Contest, a comedy show and Dog Day Afternoon give this Oktoberfest its own special flavor

Shanghai Oktoberfest, Shanghai, China

September 16-26, 2009

The biggest of the Chinese Oktoberfest events, it has an elaborate menu that is an infusion of Asian and German dishes, with a little Hungarian goulash thrown in for extra excitement. And the beer selection is just as wide. In addition, there is even a ladies night, so take advantage of this eastern beer extravaganza girls! Find cheap flights to Shanghai

 

Oktoberfest, Canberra, Australia

October 30-November 1, 2009

Ladies and gents will need their best Bavarian outfits for this particular German-styled fair, because there are dirndl and lederhosen competitions to be won. A stellar beer stein will also come in handy, with beer stein challenges to test your mettle. And don’t miss out on the chance to try out your folk dance skills, or at least watch the pros perform instead. Find cheap flights to Canberra

 

Bierfest, throughout the British Isles

Aberdeen – October 1-2, 2009, London, Oct. 21-23, Glasgow – Oct. 22, Edinburgh – Oct. 23, Dublin – Oct. 30-31, Manchester – Nov. 19-20

A series of Oktoberfest-inspired Bierfests are held across the UK & Ireland, from Dublin to London. These 1-3 day events include typical Bavarian meals, music and entertainment with wenches dressed in dirndl serving out as much beer as you can drink! Reserve your table online Find cheap flights to destinations throughout the British Isles

 

Oktoberfest Blumenau, Blumenau, Brazil

October 1-18, 2009

One of the largest Oktoberfests outside of Germany happens in the unlikely location of Blumenau, a Brazilian city established by Germans in the mid 1800s. This year will see introduction of new beers to sample, as well as a bigger and better beer zone.  And they’ll need it too; around one million beer guzzlers are expected this year.

History: Q & A About Oktoberfest

(Wikepedia)

How Did it originate?

The original “Oktoberfest” occurred in Munich, on October 18, 1810: For the commemoration of their marriage, Crown Prince Ludwig (later King Ludwig I) and Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen (namesake of the Theresienwiese festival grounds) organized a great horse race (the marriage took place on October 12; the horse race on October 17 — therefore, there are different dates named as being the first Oktoberfest).

Exactly when does it take place?

Oktoberfest is a 16-day festival held each year in Munich, Germany, running from late September to early October. It is one of the most famous events in Germany and the world’s largest fair, with some six million people attending every year, and is an important part of Bavarian culture. Other cities across the world also hold Oktoberfest celebrations, modeled after the Munich event.

The Munich Oktoberfest, traditionally, takes place during the sixteen days up to and including the first Sunday in October. In 1994, the schedule was modified in response to German reunification so that if the first Sunday in October falls on the 1st or 2nd, then the festival will go on until October 3 (German Unity Day). Thus, the festival is now 17 days when the 1st Sunday is October 2 and 18 days when it is October 1. The festival is held on an area named the Theresienwiese (field, or meadow, of Therese), often called d’ Wiesn for short.

Okay, So What about the Food?

oktoberfest food

Visitors also eat huge amounts of traditional hearty fare such as Hendl (chicken), Schweinsbraten (roast pork), Haxn (knuckle of pork), Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick), Würstel (sausages) along with Brezeln (Pretzel), Knödeln (potato or bread dumplings), Käsespätzle (cheese noodles), Reiberdatschi (potato pancakes), Sauerkraut or Rotkraut (red cabbage) along with such Bavarian delicacies as Obatzda (a fatty, spiced cheese-butter concoction) and Weisswurst (a white sausage).

 

For more about the history visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oktoberfest