Blue Martini Cocktail Recipe

martini
The martini is a cocktail made with gin and vermouth and garnished with an olive. Over the years, the martini has become one of the most well-known mixed alcoholic beverages. H. L. Mencken once called the martini “the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet”,and E. B. White called it “the elixir of quietude”.-(Wikepedia)  For a splash of color for countries with Red, White and Blue as their color, add a cherry.

The blue martini with bite!

Blue Martini Recipe Ingredients

60ml (or approx 2 oz) Vodka
15ml (or approx � oz) Blue Curacao Liqueur
10ml (or approx � oz) lime juice
small wedge of lemon or lime
6 ice cubes

Blue Martini Recipe Directions

Into a cocktail shaker, pour the Gin and Curacao.
Add ice.
Shake well.
Rub the rim of the martini glass with the wedge of lemon/ lime.
Strain and pour the contents of the cocktail shaker into a martini glass.
Finish by arranging a twist of lemon on the rim of the martini glass.

See More Martini Recipes at http://www.martinirecipe.net/apple-martini.html

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Mexican holiday punch: Ponche navideño

mexconnect.com-In addition to being served in Mexican homes during the Christmas and New Year holiday poncheseason, hot Mexican holiday punch, or ponche navideño is sold at night by street vendors who ladle it out from steaming cylindrical vats. The tejocote is a small fruit, golden in color when mature, similar in taste to an apple, but with a pastier texture. It is not easily found outside of Mexico, but apples make a good substitute. In Michoacan, a piece of beet is often added instead of jamaica to color the punch.

Ingredients

  • ¾ pound small apples or tejocotes, peeled and sliced
  • 10 guavas, halved
  • ½ pound raisins or prunes or a mixture of both
  • 6 oranges, scrubbed and sliced with rind
  • 1 cup jamaica (dried hibiscus) flowers
  • 4 pieces sugar cane stalk, peeled and cut into strips (see note)
  • 3 sticks cinnamon, each about 6 inches long
  • 7 quarts water
  • sugar to taste (the usual proportion is 1/3 cup to each quart of water)
  • brandy, rum or wine to taste (optional)

See Directions

Coquito (Puerto Rican Egg Nog) Recipe

coquito (1)

Coquito is a popular Christmas beverage in Puerto Rico. It has similarities to American eggnog, but the use of creme de coco or coconut milk gives it a unique island flavor. A version with eggs, known as ponche crema, is a favorite in Venezuela.

4 to 6 servings

 Ingredients

  • Cinnamon sticks — 2 to 3 each
  • Water — 2 cups
  • Sweetened, condensed milk — 1 (14-ounce) can
  • Evaporated milk — 1 (12-ounce) can
  • Crème de coco (for example, Coco Lopez) — 1 (12-ounce) can
  • Rum — 1 to 2 cups
  • Ground cinnamon — for garnish

SEE DIRECTIONS

See Ideas for packaging as a gift       

coquito gift    

Christmas Wine Buying Guide

Ed Draves Manager at Prestige Wine and Spirits in Buffalo, New York

Ed Draves Manager at Prestige Wine and Spirits in Buffalo, New York

The big holiday meal.

And as anyone who has ever had the in-laws over for Christmas dinner can tell you, like gift giving, this meal, with all of the innumerable side dishes also comes with lots of expectations and tension.

In that spirit, hoping to lower your stress level a few notches, the Multi Cultural Cooking Network reached out to one of our good friends, Ed Draves, Wine Manager for Prestige Wine and Spirits in Buffalo, New York, where he has worked for over 20 years.

We asked Ed for a little advice on wine pairings and that Christmas meal.  Hopefully, with the suggested pairings below, you’ll be able to do a better job of getting the right wine for whatever you are planning on serving for the big meal.

Rather than ask for a specific wine or brand, we gave him a range of food items that might be served and asked him to think generally.  That way you can look for what is locally available to fit your meal.  With that, we think we’ve got you covered.

Here’s what Ed recommends to help you out.

The famous Rockwell Turkey Dinner… Look for champagne or a nice sparkling wine.  These will pair well with what typically tends to be a rather dry main course.

Pork loin… Look for a full bodied Pinot Noir or an Alsatian wine (pictured).  Remember, you are not trying to overpower your main course, but to complement it.  Both of these will fill that role.

Alsaltian Wine

Alsaltian Wine

Prime Rib… for many this is the boldest meal of the year so you want this done right.  For this main course look for a Bordeaux or a Meritage blend.  These darker wines will stand up well next to a nice cut of beef.

Christmas Ham… if you are going this route you need to be looking for a white Riesling or aGamay(pictured) if you are looking for a red.  Ed says both of these will do a great job alongside the more salty flavored ham.

shirazBut what if you are making the newest rage, the Turducken? In that case go for a full-bodied Shiraz.  There’s a lot of variety out there so get a young one that has some nice peppery hints.

And what should you do if you are avoiding meat products and maybe have that Tofurkey ready to go?  Ed says match your sides and remember, wine is a complementing beverage for your meal.

Finally, don’t forget about dessert.  If you want to top off a great meal right, get the classic, a Port wine.  Or, if you are lucky enough to live in the Northeast, try one of the local ice wines.  Both are perfect alongside the sweetness of your dessert.

So there you have it.  A quick how to guide on buying wine for whatever you may be serving come Christmas Day.

-Written by Dave Miller, World Traveling Missionary, Former Restaurant Manager and regular contributing writer for MCCN.

 

Julmust, a Scandinavian Christmas Soda

Scandinavians are no stranger to a drink that finds its popularity during the Christmas season—julmust.  The words “jul” and “must” are Swedish for “yule” and “juice.”It’s a Scandivanian Christmas soda that is mainly consumed in Sweden. Want an indicator of its popularity in the region? Julmust outsells Coca Cola during the Christmas season and accounts for 50-percent of all soft drink volume during the month of December.

The drink is also served during Easter. None of the ingredients are different, but it goes by a different name—påskmus.The word “påsk” translate to “Easter” in Swedish.

Must is an alternative to beer, and it was created by father and son team, Robert Roberts (father) and Harry Roberts (son). The drink is compared to root beer, but it has a much sweeter taste. It contains carbonated, sugar, water, and hop and malt extract, caramel colouring, citric acid and preservatives. The carbonated beverage is sometimes stored up to a year.

Want to find julmust? You can get it at IKEA and if there is a Wegman’s in your area, check out the Grandpa Lindquist Christmas Soda.

julmust_glasflaska

History of Rompope A Christmas Holiday Drink

¡Salud! [Photographs: María del Mar Sacasa]
From seriouseats.com

Rompope is an eggnog-like drink made with eggsmilk, and vanilla flavouring. The egg yolks impart a yellow hue to the emulsified beverage. It is a traditional drink known as such in Costa RicaEl Salvador and particularly in Mexico, where, it is believed to have been originally made in the convents of the city of Puebla. The word rompope is a derivation of the word rompon, which is used to describe the Spanish version of eggnog that came to Mexico. The Spanish version utilizes rum as its main ingredient, hence the root of both words rom-pon and rom-pope, but in Central America, Guatemala,Honduras and El Salvador, there is also a similar beverage known as rompopo.

Seriouseats.com -The first rompope was brewed by nuns in the Santa Clara convent in Puebla, Mexico in the 17th century, a derivation of Spanish ponche de huevo. At the time, the Catholic Church was prominent in government and society, and convents often hosted visiting officials and religious dignitaries. As such, fine cuisine was developed in the cloisters with the Clarists garnering much acclaim for their confections and sweets.

Rompope is served chilled, often over ice, but, the drink is also popular in Nicaragua, where it is served warm as well.  READ MORE

Learn about the Puerto Rican Holiday Drink Coquito and See Recipe

Kwanzaa Unity Cup

The Karamu Feast is an important part of Kwanzaa and is celebrated on December 31. During this special day the Kwanzaa Unity cup takes center stage. Usually filled with grape juice, water, or wine, the Unity cup symbolizes the unity of African nations and is used by Kwanzaa observers to perform ancestor-praising libations. READ MORE