Shrove Tuesday AKA Pancake Day

Shrove Tuesday (also known in Commonwealth countries as Pancake Tuesday or Pancake day) is the day in February or March immediately preceding Ash Wednesday (the first day of Lent), which is celebrated in some countries by consuming pancakes. In others, especially those where it is called Mardi Gras or some translation thereof, this is a carnival day, and also the last day of “fat eating” or “gorging” before the fasting period of Lent.

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This moveable feast is determined by Easter. The expression “Shrove Tuesday” comes from the word shrive, meaning “absolve“.[1] Shrove Tuesday is observed by many Christians, including Anglicans, Lutherans, Methodists, Roman Catholics and orthodox,[2] who “make a special point of self-examination, of considering what wrongs they need to repent, and what amendments of life or areas of spiritual growth they especially need to ask God’s help in dealing with.”[3]

Being the last day of the liturgical season historically known as Shrovetide, before the penitential season of Lent, related popular practices, such as indulging in food that one sacrifices for the upcoming forty days, are associated with Shrove Tuesday celebrations, before commencing the fasting and religious obligations associated with Lent. The term Mardi Gras is French for “Fat Tuesday”, referring to the practice of the last night of eating richer, fatty foods before the ritual fasting of the Lenten season, which begins on Ash Wednesday.

See More on Wikipedia

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The British Tradition of Wearing Paper Crowns on Christmas day

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It is quite common for British people to wear King’s paper crown on Christmas Day and at Christmas dinner parties. Apparently, this tradition dates back to Roman times when participant to the Roman Saturnalia celebrations – held around 25th December – used to wear hats.

The idea of wearing paper crown probably derives from the Twelfth Night celebrations, where a King or Queen used to be appointed to supervise the proceedings.

Rustic Fig Galette Topped with Chantilly Cream — Muy Bueno Cookbook

Woohoo Thanksgiving is almost here and I can’t wait! I’ll be hosting this year and I’m so excited. I always love an excuse to entertain, and hosting Thanksgiving is one I don’t often get to do, so I am extra excited. (more…) The post Rustic Fig Galette Topped with Chantilly Cream appeared first on Muy…

via Rustic Fig Galette Topped with Chantilly Cream — Muy Bueno Cookbook

Croatian Christmas Traditions and Epiphany

In Croatian Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Sretan Božić’. Happy/Merry Christmas in lots more languages.

In Croatia, preparations for Christmas start on 25th November which is St Catherine’s day. People also celebrate Advent. Over 85% of people in Croatia are Catholics so Advent is an important time for them.

It’s traditional to have an Advent wreath made of straw or evergreen twigs which has four candles

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are mostly celebrated with close family. On Boxing day friends and extended family visit each other.

On Christmas Eve, most people eat dried-cod called ‘bakalar’ or some other kind of fish as it’s considered as meat fast (so you can’t eat meat).

The main Christmas Day is often turkey, goose or duck. A popular side dish is sarma (cabbage rolls filled with minced pork meat).

There’s also always lots of small cookies and cakes to eat including ‘fritule’ which are Croatian donuts flavored with lemon.

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The Christmas celebrations finish on Epiphany (6th January).

Read More:

Croatia: Epiphany, Red Wine And Taking Down Of Christmas Tree Tradition

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Central America: The Poinsettia, A Christmas Plant

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For those who celebrate Christmas in frostier places of the
world, our most used plant of the season is the Poinsettia.  You see the image on tablecloths, table runners and so forth.  And if done well, conside putting them on your Christmas table.

Poinsettia plants are native to Central America, especially an area of southern Mexico known as ‘Taxco del Alarcon’ where they flower during the winter.

The shape of the poinsettia flower and leaves are sometimes thought as a symbol of the Star of Bethlehem which led the Wise Men to Jesus. The red colored leaves symbolize the blood of Christ. The white leaves represent his purity.

poinsettia

Recipe for Rosca de Reyes(King Cake Recipe)

This bready, donut-shaped cake is decorated with dried fruits and spiked with a non-edible representation of the baby Jesus. Rosca de reyes is traditionally eaten on January 6 to commemorate the biblical story of the arrival of the Three Kings(Also known as the Epiphany) Finding the baby Jesus in your slice of cake is an honor –  See Recipe from the Latinkitchen.com

http://thelatinkitchen.com/recipe/rosca-de-reyes-kings-cake

 

 

Christmas in the Philippines

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known for gorgeous Parols ( Christmas lanterns), Tarlac province comes alive Photo Credit Wikipedia

 

Christmas in the Philippines, one of two predominantly Catholic countries in Asia (the other one being East Timor), is one of the biggest holidays on the calendar. The country has earned the distinction of celebrating the world’s longest Christmas season, with Christmas carols are heard as early as September and the season lasting up until Epiphany.

World’s Longest Christmas Season

The Philippines has earned the distinction of celebrating the world’s longest Christmas season. Although faint traces of the coming Christmas arise beginning from early September, it is traditionally ushered in by the nine-day dawn Masses that start on Dec. 16. Known as the Misas de Aguinaldo (Gift Masses) or Misa de Gallo (Rooster’s Mass) in the traditional Spanish. These Masses are more popularly known in Tagalog as the Simbang Gabi. Christmas Eve on December 24 is the much-anticipated “noche buena” — the traditional Christmas feast after the midnight mass. Family members dine together on traditional noche buena fare, which includes the quéso de bóla (“ball cheese”, usually edam cheese) and jamón (Christmas ham). Usually, aside from the already legal holidays which are Rizal Day (December 30) and New Year’s Eve (December 31), other days in close proximity such as Christmas Eve (December 24), Niños Innocentes (December 28), and the Epiphany (traditionally, January 6) are also declared as non-working days. In Asia, Christmas is also the liveliest in the Philippines, since the country is one of the few predominantly Christian nation in the continent besides Russia, East Timor, Georgia and Armenia.

Food Traditions

For Filipinos, Christmas Eve (“Bisperas ng Pasko”/Spanish: Vísperas de la Navidad) on December 24 is celebrated with the Midnight Mass, and immediately after, the much-anticipated Noche Buena – the traditional Christmas Eve feast. Family members dine together around 12 midnight on traditional Nochebuena fare, which includes: queso de bola (Spanish: “ball of cheese”; this is actually edam cheese), “Tsokolate” (a hot chocolate drink made from cacao and traditionally from crushed peanuts which add a pleasant grittiness and nutty flavor*.) and jamón (Christmas ham). Some would also open presents at this time.

 

*Source Wikepedia

*-Definition of Tsokolate-Desserts come first

Chef Jamie Oliver’s Spicy Jerk Ham

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Easter is a ham’s time to shine, but Thanksgiving or Christmas—fuggedaboutit! “No more!” says the pig. Tired of being the other meat, your ham is claiming center stage this holiday season. Move over turkey! Chef Jaimie Oliver adds a Caribbean spin to pork with this recipe for Spicy Jerk Ham.

For poaching

  • 1 x 5kg leg of ham
  • 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1 red onion, peeled and cut into wedges
  • 6 Scotch bonnets, halved
  • 2 teaspoons whole cloves
  • 1 stick of celery, trimmed and roughly chopped
  • 1 small leek, washed and roughly chopped
  • 3 bay leaves,
  • 1/2 bunch thyme,
  • 1 cinnamon stick

Jerk marinade

  • 6 fresh bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons allspice
  • 1 tablespoon cloves
  • 2 tablespoons ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 red onions, peeled and quartered
  • 8 Scotch bonnets chillies, stalks removed
  • 250ml dark rum
  • 250ml malt vinegar
  • a small bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked

Ham glaze

  • 3/4 jar good quality, fine-cut marmalade
  • 125ml golden rum

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-1098836/Spicy-Jerk-Ham.html#ixzz1eX23B000

Thanksgiving Vocabulary en Español (el Día de Acción de Gracias)

Prepare to speak Spanish on Thanksgiving by learning these words related to the holiday.

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Keep in mind, though, that names of foods don’t necessarily translate well, or might not be understood in Spanish-speaking countries, due to cultural differences. For example, the various words that can be translated as “pie” include pasteltarta,empanada, and even pay. All of those words except the last also refer to other types of desserts, and it might take an explanation or picture to make the meaning clear to someone not familiar with the food being talked about. The flip side of that, as an example, is that while the word relleno would normally be used to refer to turkey stuffing, the same word can be used for just about any type of food filling. Someone unfamiliar with U.S. holiday cuisine may not know specifically what the word refers to without an explanation.

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Portuguese Sausage Dressing Recipe

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n a spin on the familiar Thanksgiving sausage and bread dressing, this version uses linguica (Portuguese sausage), a common ingredient in Hawaii.

PREP AND COOK TIME About 1 hour, plus 30 to 40 minutes baking time

MAKES 16 servings

Marinated giblets and 1 cup marinade from
Hawaiian-Portuguese Smoked Turkey
(Click to See Recipe)
1/2 cup butter
3 cups finely chopped celery
2 cups chopped onion
1 3/4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1 tsp. poultry seasoning
1 tsp. minced fresh sage
1 tbsp. minced garlic
8 oz. linguica (Portuguese sausage)
16 cups 3/4-in. cubes coarse, crusty white bread
1/2 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley1. In a small saucepan, bring giblets and marinade to a simmer over medium heat, cover. Cook giblets 20 minutes, or until cooked through. Let cool; finely chop. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking liquid.

2. Preheat oven to 375[degrees]. Melt butter in a 10- to 12-in. skillet over medium-high heat. Add celery, onion, and chopped giblets and saute, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. Add 3/4 cup chicken broth, poultry seasoning, sage, and garlic. Lower heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until celery and onion are tender, 20 minutes. Meanwhile, cut linguica in half lengthwise, then slice into 1/4-in.-thick half-moons.

3. Put bread cubes in a large bowl and stir in celery mixture, linguica, and parsley. Stir in 1/2 cup giblet cooking liquid and remaining 1 cup chicken broth.

4. Spoon dressing into a 4- to 5-qt. baking dish and cover loosely with foil. Bake 25 minutes, uncover, and cook until browned on top, 10 to 20 minutes more. Serve hot.

Click Here For More Great Recipes for Thanksgiving in Hawaii