Thanksgiving Vocabulary en Español (el Día de Acción de Gracias)

Prepare to speak Spanish on Thanksgiving by learning these words related to the holiday.

Thanksgiving-1

Keep in mind, though, that names of foods don’t necessarily translate well, or might not be understood in Spanish-speaking countries, due to cultural differences. For example, the various words that can be translated as “pie” include pasteltarta,empanada, and even pay. All of those words except the last also refer to other types of desserts, and it might take an explanation or picture to make the meaning clear to someone not familiar with the food being talked about. The flip side of that, as an example, is that while the word relleno would normally be used to refer to turkey stuffing, the same word can be used for just about any type of food filling. Someone unfamiliar with U.S. holiday cuisine may not know specifically what the word refers to without an explanation.

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Portuguese Sausage Dressing Recipe

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n a spin on the familiar Thanksgiving sausage and bread dressing, this version uses linguica (Portuguese sausage), a common ingredient in Hawaii.

PREP AND COOK TIME About 1 hour, plus 30 to 40 minutes baking time

MAKES 16 servings

Marinated giblets and 1 cup marinade from
Hawaiian-Portuguese Smoked Turkey
(Click to See Recipe)
1/2 cup butter
3 cups finely chopped celery
2 cups chopped onion
1 3/4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1 tsp. poultry seasoning
1 tsp. minced fresh sage
1 tbsp. minced garlic
8 oz. linguica (Portuguese sausage)
16 cups 3/4-in. cubes coarse, crusty white bread
1/2 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley1. In a small saucepan, bring giblets and marinade to a simmer over medium heat, cover. Cook giblets 20 minutes, or until cooked through. Let cool; finely chop. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking liquid.

2. Preheat oven to 375[degrees]. Melt butter in a 10- to 12-in. skillet over medium-high heat. Add celery, onion, and chopped giblets and saute, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. Add 3/4 cup chicken broth, poultry seasoning, sage, and garlic. Lower heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until celery and onion are tender, 20 minutes. Meanwhile, cut linguica in half lengthwise, then slice into 1/4-in.-thick half-moons.

3. Put bread cubes in a large bowl and stir in celery mixture, linguica, and parsley. Stir in 1/2 cup giblet cooking liquid and remaining 1 cup chicken broth.

4. Spoon dressing into a 4- to 5-qt. baking dish and cover loosely with foil. Bake 25 minutes, uncover, and cook until browned on top, 10 to 20 minutes more. Serve hot.

Click Here For More Great Recipes for Thanksgiving in Hawaii

Make a Mexican-Influenced Thanksgiving Meal with a Mole-Roasted Turkey

Ready to take a walk on the wild side this Thanksgiving.  Ready to shun the usual light brown glaze of your turkey in favor mole turkeyof a blackened one. They say the darker the turkey the juicier the meat. Okay, I made that up, however;  prepared properly, Epicurious says, ” This gorgeous bird emerges from the oven nearly black and very deeply flavored.”  Make mole part of your Thanksgiving Day celebration, adding a little Mexican flair to your Thanksgiving menu with this Mole-roasted turkey with chile gravy.

If you are looking at the picture and expecting the turkey to be crispy, it’s not. The mole sauce makes the skin very tender and juicy. Sides are optional, but if you are looking to go all the way with this Mexican-influenced Thanksgiving meal, stuff your bird with masa stuffing. Click the links below to learn more about making this truly unique Thanksgiving meal.  Let us know what you think about the recipes.

Making the Mole:     Mole sauce for turkey

Making the stuffing: Masa stuffing

Making the turkey:   Mole Roasted turkey and Chile Gravy

Recipes from Epicurious.com

Roasted MacFarlane Pheasant, Celery, Chestnut Stuffing

Guided by market-fresh inspiration from farmer to plate, Chef Michael McDonald’s contemporary American cuisine Pheasantcelebrates daily life. A stylish Chicago West Loop restaurant, one sixtyblue captures the essence of leisurely dining at the American table.

“I’ve learned so much during my experiences in various kitchens, from forging relationships with purveyors to getting the freshest ingredients to Mexico, to handling the stress and volume of a top notch Manhattan operation.

Chef Michael McDonald says “I’m so happy to be back in Chicago, heading up the kitchen at such a reputable restaurant.”

Yield for two persons. INGREDIENTS:For Pheasant

  • Whole pheasant 1 ea
  • celery chestnut stuffing 2 cup: see recipe below
  • 12 pcs brussel sprouts, boiled in salted water till tender, quartered.
  • Diced bacon 2 oz
  • Chicken stock 3 oz
  • Butter 2 oz

DIRECTIONS: For Phesant
1. Season pheasant with salt and pepper and sear the bird in a hot pan with a small amount of vegetable oil, turn bird on all sides to sear evenly.
2. Place bird in a 350 degree oven for about 20 minutes; to check make a small cut in thigh meat and juices should run out clear, not red
3. Let bird rest before cutting.
4. Cut the legs and thigh off and pick the meat from the bones, reserve.
5. Carve the breasts off the bone and reserve.INGREDIENTS:For Stuffing
Onion, chopped fine 1 Tbs
Celery, chopped fine 1 Tbs
Chestnuts, frozen is ok, chopped fine 2 Tbs
Garlic, minced ¼ tsp
Bread crumbs, course, dried 1 ½ cup
Butter, whole 2 oz
Chicken stock 2 cup
Parsley, chopped 1 tsp
Thyme, fresh, picked from stem 1 pcs
Sage, fresh, chopped 1 ps
Olive oil 1 oz
DIRECTIONS: 1.In a small pot, heat oil and add onion, celery and garlic and sauté for 5 minutes on medium heat.
2. Add chestnuts, breadcrumbs, herbs, butter and chicken stock and cook all together.
3.Finish with picked leg and thigh meat, parsley and salt and pepper.
To Serve: Spoon the stuffing onto two plates. Use a ring mold if you want to make presentation better. Slice the pheasant breasts and arrange on top of stuffing. In a hot sauté pan, add bacon and cook until crispy. Add cooked brussel sprouts, salt and pepper and spoon over pheasant.

Chef Harris’ Tricks and Tips for Surviving the Holidays with Diabetes

 

holidays-diabetes

http://eugeenapatterson.com-I find that with this diabetes I can be disciplined most of the time except during the holiday season. Who in their right mind is not tempted by the scent of gooey desserts and those traditional dishes like mac & cheese and cornbread dressing? Well, I am tempted but can’t afford to give in to it with this diabetes.

Chef Harris kindly sent me some tips that I’m going to share with you and think you should share too. This is what she said:

  • Use sweetener in your coffee and tea. Keep a tiny amount of a natural sweetener like agave nectar or honey in your pocketbook at all times for when you’re away from home.
  • Don’t over indulge in starches. I know that’s easier said than done but take only a tablespoon of dressing, mac & cheese or mashed potatoes. Have a bit more of the green bean casserole instead or best of all, green beans without all of the extra stuff in the casserole.
  • Have someone else fix your plate. This always works better than you fixing it. Tell them to give you only a tiny bit of everything. If there’s something there you know you shouldn’t have, be brave and tell them to skip it and give you a little extra of something safe and healthy.

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my-plate

The Tradition of Roasting Pig & Cuban Roast Suckling Pig Recipe

pig roast or hog roast is an event or gathering which involves the barbecuing of whole hog (the castrated male pig or boar, bred for consumption at about 12 months old). Pig roasts in the mainland American Deep South are often referred to as a pig pickin’, although roasts are also a common occurrence in Cuba as well as the non-mainland US state of Hawaii (a luau),[3] with roasts being done in the mainland states by descendants of other areas.

new pig photo

The tradition of the pig roast goes back centuries, and possibly longer. There are many ways to roast pork, including open fire rotisserie style roasting, and “caja china” style box grilling.[4] Many families traditionally have a pig roast for Thanksgiving or Christmas. In Miami and other areas with large Cuban, Puerto Rican, or other Caribbean populations pig roasts are often held on Christmas Eve by families and friends[5][6] whereas families from Hawaii often hold a roast on memorial day.

Ingredients

  • juice of 20 limes, strained
  • juice of 8 oranges, strained
  • 4 large heads garlic
  • 1 cup minced fresh oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 4 cups roughly chopped cilantro leaves
  • 1 tablespoon parsley leaves
  • 5 tablespoons salt
  • 1 whole suckling pig (12 to 15 pounds), split and washed

Directions

Place pig, belly down, into a large deep roasting pan. Thoroughly rub pig with marinade. Place in refrigerator overnight, basting occasionally.
Preheat oven to 275 °F. Pour off excess marinade from pan.
Cover pig’s ears, snout and tail with aluminum foil.
Prop mouth open with 1½ inch ball of foil.  Place in oven and cook for about 4½ hours (20 minutes per pound) or until internal temperature reads 160 °F.
Baste with marinade every 30 minutes. If pig starts to get too dark while cooking, cover with aluminum foil.

El Salvador: Pan con Pavo Recipe

Pavo, or turkey, is a popular Christmas meal in El Salvador. Salvadoran immigrants to the U.S. often serve it for Thanksgiving as well. The Salvadoran version of roast turkey has a variety of vegetables and spices that are roasted along with the turkey in the roasting pan. This tasty mixture is then pureed and served as a rich sauce to accompany the turkey.  See Recipe

Hawaiian-Portuguese Smoked Turkey

A wave of Portuguese came to Hawaii in the late 1800s to work the sugarcane fields, and over time their cooking traditions fused with those of other cultures in the islands, including Chinese and Japanese.  

PREP AND COOK TIME 4 to 5 hours, plus 2 days to marinate

MAKES 1 turkey (18 to 20 lbs.)

starts with a frozen turkey and marinates it for 3 days; our version starts with a thawed or fresh bird. If your arms aren’t strong, it’s helpful to have a friend or relative help you ease the turkey on and off the grill.

1 turkey (18 to 20 lbs.), thawed if frozen
1 tbsp. each coarsely chopped ginger and
garlic, plus 4 tbsp. each minced garlic
and ginger
4 cups soy sauce
1 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp. light brown or turbinado sugar
6 cups hickory chips
2 cups chicken broth
2 large onions, peeled and quartered
lengthwise

Click Here to See the Direction for 3 Day Process

Talkin’ Turkey- Turkey Recipes and How to Brine

Photo by Crystal Johnson

Photo by Crystal Johnson

During the Holiday Season in America usually starting at Thanksgiving and ending with Christmas, turkey is one of the most eaten birds.  Some are experts at cooking turkey.   Others are looking for the next best way to impress guest with an innovative interpretation of how to prepare it.  While are others are paralyzed at the thought of making one for the first time.   In fact, I admit to 20 years of adult age fear until someone assumed that because I am the editor of Multi Cultural Cooking Network that I knew how to prepare one.  She was a born in India but grew up the first half of her life in England and has now lived in the states for over 20 years.  Her family wanted an American Thanksgiving meal.  She was all set to prepare Indian food so she asked for my help. I put on my best poker face and talked her through and helped with the turkey, ham and other holiday sides.  The point is she didn’t know we were both experiencing preparing our very first Thanksgiving turkey.  My dad and my mother had shown me different techniques over the years.  It sunk in.  I just didn’t know it.  My dad showed me how to brine. It is  a sure fire way for a flavorful  turkey.  Also don’t be ashamed of the turkey bag.  If it is your first time and you fear having a dry turkey then use the bag. – Crystal A. Johnson, MCCN Editor and Chief

 Here are some recipes and techniques

North America: The Presidential Turkey Pardon

President Obama Pardons a Lucky Turkey Photo © Alex Wong/Getty Images

The presidential pardoning of one lucky turkey is a fairly modern practice.  Although Abraham Lincoln could get  unofficial credit according to some historians.  Supposedly, their family had a pet turkey that Lincoln’s son viewed as a pet and asked to be spared.

President John F. Kennedy spontaneously spared a turkey on Nov. 19, 1963, just days before his assassination, but did not grant a “pardon.” The bird was wearing a sign reading, “Good Eatin’ Mr. President.” Kennedy responded, “Let’s just keep him.”

In 1989, George H.W. Bush became the first president to pardon a turkey. Before then, turkeys were presented to the president and consumed by the president.

The concept of a turkey pardoning was first mentioned by president Regan as a joke, but H.W. Bush made it all possible with the following words: “This fine Tom turkey, has been granted a presidential pardon as of right now.”

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