Popular Instruments of the Dominican Republic

Music is the colorful backdrop of the Dominican Republic.  There are few favorite instruments there:

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The Tambora

The Güira is a metal scraper from the Dominican Republic used as a percussion instrument in merengue and, to a lesser extent, other genres such as bachata. 

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Watch tutorial on how to play it:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KxIDwcmWY0

Downtown Los Angeles: 5th Annual Taste of Mexico

Photo by Multi Cultural Cooking Network (Crystal Johnson)

The Taste of Mexico’s signature event takes place under the stars with extensive food tastings, tequila tent, mezcaleria installation by Mezcal Legendario Domingo making its U.S. debut, Ilegal Mezcal, Mezcal Los Javis, Mezcal El Silencio, michelada beer garden by Victoria Beer and Guelaguetza’s Miche Mobil, and live entertainment by A Poco No!, Jarocho Group Tenocelomeh and Metralleta de Oro DJ Collective.

New Highlights from this year’s Taste of Mexico will include: Pettycash, Guerrilla Tacos, Colonia Publica, Corazón y Miel’s Bar extraordinaire Robin Chopra, Aqui es Texcoco, Taco Libre, Chichen Itzá, Día de Los Puercos Food Truck, Gabbi’s Mexican Kitchen and Cocina Condesa (full restaurant lineup below).

Regional food from LA favorites Guelaguetza, La Casita Mexicana, Mexicano, Frida, Frida Tacos, Lotería Grill, Torta Co., Mexicali Taco & Co., Casa Oaxaca, Tortas Bravas, Candela Taco Bar, Yuca’s, Tacos Punta Cabras, Mercado, Yxta and more…

Mariscos from Ceviche Project, Coni’Seafood, El Coraloense, Pez Cantina and Mariscos El Faro Food Truck.

Sweet Additions include La Monarca Bakery, Artesana Ice Pops, Mr. Churro, Frijolitos Mobile Coffee Cart and freshly spun cotton candy made with tamarind, mango and chocolate flavors by Love Swirls Cotton Candy. A complete list of this year’s participants can be found on The Taste of Mexico Association’s website.

Photo by Multiculturalcookingnetwork (Crystal Johnson)

New to the Event is The Taste of Mexico MERCADO, a one day market showcasing Los Angeles’ finest local products, artisanal edibles, home goods and apparel. Confirmed vendors include: Mala by Patty Rodriguez, Lil’ Libros,  LA Libreria and more…

Saturday, October 17th, 2015

La Plaza De Las Culturas y Artes

501 N. Main st.  Downtown, Los Angeles

VIP HOUR : 6:00 – 7:00 pm

GENERAL ADMIN:  7:00 – 11:00 PM

Cuban Influence on Miami

Image from http://www.etraveltrips.com/

written by Catrina Sally

The influx of Miami’s Cuban population began in the 1950’s. Following the rise of Fidel Castro, many Cuban refugees fled to Florida. Over 150,000 Immigrants travelled by plane and by boat to Miami. Welcomed into the city with opened arms, the refugees morphed Miami into “Little Havana.”

The cultural effect of the Cuban population is readily visible in Miami.  The people of Cuba have influenced the clothing, music, architecture, and food of the Florida city.  You can see, hear, and taste their influence in everything from the funky salsa music to the mint and rum laden Mojito.

Like most cultures, food is an important aspect of the Cuban Community. Cuban food is characterized by its heavy use of rice. Popular dishes include arroz con pollo (chicken and rice), pan con bistec (steak sandwich), platanos maduros (sweet plantains), and lechon asado (pork).

Watch People Try Cuban Food For the First Time:

Check out some the Cuban Recipes we have hear at MCCN

https://multiculturalcookingnetwork.wordpress.com/category/latino-foodcomida/cuban/

Or Visit

Visit http://icuban.com/

Recipe for Rosca de Reyes(King Cake Recipe)

This bready, donut-shaped cake is decorated with dried fruits and spiked with a non-edible representation of the baby Jesus. Rosca de reyes is traditionally eaten on January 6 to commemorate the biblical story of the arrival of the Three Kings(Also known as the Epiphany) Finding the baby Jesus in your slice of cake is an honor –  See Recipe from the Latinkitchen.com

http://thelatinkitchen.com/recipe/rosca-de-reyes-kings-cake

 

 

Peru: Recipe for Papa a la Huancaína

10262178_744512732293468_1356980109194298924_nPapa a la Huancaína is a Peruvian salad with boiled potatoes in a spicy, creamy sauce. It is an appetizer that I first got an opportunity to taste when my sister(mi hermana) from church brought it one Sunday afternoon and then my second time was at a holiday party.  See the recipe.  -Crystal Johnson, MCCN Editor

Click for Recipe

http://www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes/papa-a-la-huancaina/

Thanksgiving Vocabulary en Español (el Día de Acción de Gracias)

Prepare to speak Spanish on Thanksgiving by learning these words related to the holiday.

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Keep in mind, though, that names of foods don’t necessarily translate well, or might not be understood in Spanish-speaking countries, due to cultural differences. For example, the various words that can be translated as “pie” include pasteltarta,empanada, and even pay. All of those words except the last also refer to other types of desserts, and it might take an explanation or picture to make the meaning clear to someone not familiar with the food being talked about. The flip side of that, as an example, is that while the word relleno would normally be used to refer to turkey stuffing, the same word can be used for just about any type of food filling. Someone unfamiliar with U.S. holiday cuisine may not know specifically what the word refers to without an explanation.

Click to See Listing

Ecuador: The People, Music, Food and Dance

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Music
The music of Ecuador has a long history. Pasillo is a genre of indigenous Latin music. In Ecuador it is the “national genre of music.” Through the years, many cultures have influenced to establish new types of music. There are also different kinds of traditional music like albazo, pasacalle, fox incaico, tonada, capishca, Bomba highly established in afro-Ecuadorian society like Esmeraldas, and so on. Tecnocumbia and Rockola are clear examples of foreign cultures influence. One of the most traditional forms of dancing in Ecuador is Sanjuanito. It’s originally from the North of Ecuador (Otavalo-Imbabura). Sanjuanito is a danceable music used in the festivities of the mestizo and indigenous
culture.

The Food
Ecuadorian cuisine is diverse, varying with the altitude and associated agricultural conditions. Most regions in Ecuador follow the traditional three course meal of soup, a second course which includes rice and a protein such as meat or fish, and then dessert and coffee to finish. Supper is usually lighter, and sometimes consists only of coffee or herbal tea with bread.
In the highland region, pork, chicken, beef, and cuy (guinea pig) are popular and are served with a variety of grains (especially rice and corn) or potatoes.

Watch a Taste of the Music, Food and Dance of Ecuador:

Music
The music of Ecuador has a long history. Pasillo is a genre of indigenous Latin music. In Ecuador it is the “national genre of music.” Through the years, many cultures have influenced to establish new types of music. There are also different kinds of traditional music like albazo, pasacalle, fox incaico, tonada, capishca, Bomba highly established in afro-Ecuadorian society like Esmeraldas, and so on. Tecnocumbia and Rockola are clear examples of foreign cultures influence. One of the most traditional forms of dancing in Ecuador is Sanjuanito. It’s originally from the North of Ecuador (Otavalo-Imbabura). Sanjuanito is a danceable music used in the festivities of the mestizo and indigenous
culture.

The Food
Ecuadorian cuisine is diverse, varying with the altitude and associated agricultural conditions. Most regions in Ecuador follow the traditional three course meal of soup, a second course which includes rice and a protein such as meat or fish, and then dessert and coffee to finish. Supper is usually lighter, and sometimes consists only of coffee or herbal tea with bread.
In the highland region, pork, chicken, beef, and cuy (guinea pig) are popular and are served with a variety of grains (especially rice and corn) or potatoes.Ceviche_ecuador

n the coastal region, seafood is very popular, with fish, shrimp and ceviche being key parts of the diet. Generally, ceviches are served with fried plantain (chifles y patacones), popcorn or tostado[disambiguation needed]. Plantain- and peanut-based dishes are the basis of most coastal meals. Encocados (dishes that contain a coconut sauce) are also very popular. Churrasco is a staple food of the coastal region, especially Guayaquil. Arroz con menestra y carne asada (rice with beans and grilled beef) is one of the traditional dishes of Guayaquil, as is fried plantain which is often served with it. This region is a leading producer of bananas, cacao beans (to make chocolate), shrimp, tilapia, mangos and passion fruit, among other products.

 
 

The Multi-Cultural Nicole Richie

Nicole

Moment from “The Simple Life” Paris (R) Nicole (L)

She grabbed the attention of millions along with buddy Paris Hilton on the reality show entitled, “The Simple Life.”     She is the adopted daughter of  legendary African American pop singer Lionel Richie and Paris Hilton the descendant of the famous Hilton Family hotel industry owners.   When Nicole and Paris shared a glimpse of their lives as socialites trying to do manual labor it was an overnight sensation especially because reality TV was in its infancy.    Recently, Richie has returned to public life onscreen with her Aol Huffington Post series, “Candidly Nicole” which has moved to television

Her Ethnic Background

According to several sources including Aceshowbiz.com,   Nicole is said to be of  Black,Caucasian  and Mexican ethnicity, Nicole was born on September 21, 1981 in Berkeley, California. Given the name Nicole Camilla Escovedo, she is the biological daughter of a Latin musician named Peter Michael Escovedo III (related to Sheila E.) and an anonymous backstage female assistant of Lionel Richie during his world tour in 1980. Raised alone by Escovedo who was also a member of Richie’s band, little Nicole spent most of her time on the backstage and studio since her father often took her along by his side.
As Richie gradually grew a deep affection toward Nicole, the three-years-old girl was taken to live with this famous musician and his first wife, Brenda Harvey, under Escovedo’s approval. She was legally adopted at the age of nine by the couple for …(READ MORE)

Read more: http://www.aceshowbiz.com/celebrity/nicole_richie/biography.html#ixzz38PLd4wKq

Belizean “BBQ’d” Fish Recipe

Belizean BBQ Fish
Belize is located in North America on the northern edge of the Central America isthmus – a somewhat narrow strip of land that connects North andSouth America. While it is hard to pin down any truly distinctive Belizean cuisine, what you will find in Belize is a mix of Caribbean, Mexican, African, Spanish, and Mayan culinary influences. Seafood is a staple of Belize. Barracuda and Snapper are among some of the prominent fish of the waters.
  • 2 large white-fish type fillets (like cod or orange roughy)
  • 4 large carrots
  • 1 Texas 1015 (or other sweet) onion
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 2 jalapenos (optional)
  • 2 banana peppers (optional)
  • 1 lemon
  • Greek Seasoning *
  • Garlic Powder
  • Grate carrots and set aside. Dice onions into 1/4″
  • cubes and set aside. Dice bell pepper in 1/4″ cubes.

If using jalapeno, dice very fine. If using banana peppers, slice very thinly. Mix all peppers (bell and others) and set aside. Tear off a large (12″) piece of aluminum foil. Spread 1/4 of the grated carrots out on foil and sprinkle 1/4 of the onion on top of the carrot. Sprinkle one side of the fillet with seasonings and place the fillet on top of the carrots and onions, seasoning side down. Sprinkle more seasonings on top of fillet. Cover fillet with 1/2 of pepper mixture, 1/4 onions, 1/4 carrots. Squeeze 1/2 lemon over fish and veggies.

Fold tin foil so it covers fish and veggies well and seal. Repeat for other fillet. Place on grill at medium temperature 10 minutes on each side. Serve with pepper side up. If you can’t find Greek Seasoning, a substitute would be to use salt, pepper, a little more garlic powder, and a touch of oregano

Black in Latin America | Cuba: The Next Revolution

The term Afro-Cuban refers to Cubans who mostly have Sub Saharan African ancestry, and to historical or cultural elements in Cuba thought to emanate from this community. The term can refer to the combining of African and other cultural elements found in Cuban society such as race,religion, music, language, the arts, and class culture.

During the 1920s and 1930s Cuba experienced a movement geared towards Afro-Cuban culture called Afrocubanismo.  The movement had a large impact on Cuban literature, poetry, painting, music, and sculpture. It was the first artistic campaign in Cuba that focused on one particular theme: black culture. Specifically it highlighted the struggle for independence from Spain, black slavery, and building a purely Cuban national identity. Its goal was to incorporate African folklore and rhythm into traditional modes of art.

Cuban rumba, born in the poor sections of Cuban cities and carrying dance styles and rhythms that echo the African traditions of Cuban slaves.

Watch – Black in Latin America Documentary – Cuba: The Next Revolution

http://video.pbs.org/video/1898347038/