The Multi-Cultural Nicole Richie

Nicole

Moment from “The Simple Life” Paris (R) Nicole (L)

She grabbed the attention of millions along with buddy Paris Hilton on the reality show entitled, “The Simple Life.”     She is the adopted daughter of  legendary African American pop singer Lionel Richie and Paris Hilton the descendant of the famous Hilton Family hotel industry owners.   When Nicole and Paris shared a glimpse of their lives as socialites trying to do manual labor it was an overnight sensation especially because reality TV was in its infancy.    Recently, Richie has returned to public life onscreen with her Aol Huffington Post series, “Candidly Nicole” which has moved to television

Her Ethnic Background

According to several sources including Aceshowbiz.com,   Nicole is said to be of  Black,Caucasian  and Mexican ethnicity, Nicole was born on September 21, 1981 in Berkeley, California. Given the name Nicole Camilla Escovedo, she is the biological daughter of a Latin musician named Peter Michael Escovedo III (related to Sheila E.) and an anonymous backstage female assistant of Lionel Richie during his world tour in 1980. Raised alone by Escovedo who was also a member of Richie’s band, little Nicole spent most of her time on the backstage and studio since her father often took her along by his side.
As Richie gradually grew a deep affection toward Nicole, the three-years-old girl was taken to live with this famous musician and his first wife, Brenda Harvey, under Escovedo’s approval. She was legally adopted at the age of nine by the couple for …(READ MORE)

Read more: http://www.aceshowbiz.com/celebrity/nicole_richie/biography.html#ixzz38PLd4wKq

Black in Latin America | Cuba: The Next Revolution

The term Afro-Cuban refers to Cubans who mostly have Sub Saharan African ancestry, and to historical or cultural elements in Cuba thought to emanate from this community. The term can refer to the combining of African and other cultural elements found in Cuban society such as race,religion, music, language, the arts, and class culture.

During the 1920s and 1930s Cuba experienced a movement geared towards Afro-Cuban culture called Afrocubanismo.  The movement had a large impact on Cuban literature, poetry, painting, music, and sculpture. It was the first artistic campaign in Cuba that focused on one particular theme: black culture. Specifically it highlighted the struggle for independence from Spain, black slavery, and building a purely Cuban national identity. Its goal was to incorporate African folklore and rhythm into traditional modes of art.

Cuban rumba, born in the poor sections of Cuban cities and carrying dance styles and rhythms that echo the African traditions of Cuban slaves.

Watch – Black in Latin America Documentary – Cuba: The Next Revolution

http://video.pbs.org/video/1898347038/

A Whole Lot to Bruno Mars than Meets The Eye

Bruno Mars was born Peter Gene Hernandez on October 8, 1985, in Honolulu, Hawaii, and was raised in the Waikiki neighborhood of Honolulu. He is the son of Peter Hernandez and Bernadette “Bernie” San Pedro Bayot (died June 1, 2013).[11][12] His father is of half Puerto Rican and half Jewish (from Hungary and Ukraine) descent, and is originally fromBrooklyn, New York.[13][14] Mars’ mother immigrated to Hawaii from the Philippines as a child, and was of Filipino, and some Spanish, descent.[13][15][16] His parents met while performing in a show, where his mother was a hula dancer and his father played percussion.[14] At the age of two, he was nicknamed “Bruno” by his father, because of his resemblance to legendary professional wrestler Bruno Sammartino.

In an interview with Just Jared, Bruno Mars discussed some of his favorite food and about his cooking skills:

JJ: Growing up, did your mom cook for you? What was your favorite Puerto Rican food, Filipino food?

Chicken Adobo of course. My father’s mom would make this thing called Spanish Rice. It’s yellow rice with olives, peppers and a whole bunch of other stuff.

JJ: Do you cook yourself?

BM: A little bit. I can get down. I can make pop tarts. (laughs) Actually I can. I learned a lot from my mom.

Click Here For More of the Interview

The Triple Threat Rita Moreno

Rita Moreno in blackRole model, beautiful, and talented are just thing which make the acclaimed actress Rita Moreno a triple threat.  The legendary Rita Moreno took Hollywood and the world by storm with her singing, dancing and acting ability.   Those three talents helped to land her three of the arts top awards.

IMDB-American actress Rita Moreno has managed to have a thriving career for the better part of six decades despite the institutional racism that has plagued the entertainment industry, particularly the anti-Hispanic bias that stereotyped Hispanic women as “spitfires” and sexpots. Moreno, one of the very few (and very first) performers to win an Oscar, an Emmy, a Tony, and a Grammy, was born Rosita Dolores Alverío in Humacao, Puerto Rico on December 11, 1931. She moved to New York City in 1937 along with her mother, where she began a professional career before she was a teenager. The 11-year-old Rosita got her first movie experience dubbing Spanish-language versions of American films. Less than a month before her 14th birthday on November 11, 1945, she made her Broadway debut in the play “Skydrift” at the Belasco Theatre, co-starring with Arthur Keegan and the young Eli Wallach. Although she would not appear again on Broadway for almost 20 years, Rita Moreno, as she was billed in the play, had arrived professionally. It would take her nearly as long to break through the forces of institutional racism and become the first Hispanic woman to win an AcademyAward.

Rita Moreno in Westside Story

The cover of the March 1, 1954 edition of “Life Magazine” featured a three-quarters, over-the-left shoulder profile of the young Puerto Rican actress/entertainer with the provocative title “Rita Moreno: An Actresses’ Catalog of Sex and Innocence.” It was sexpot time, a stereotype that would plague her throughout the decade. If not cast as a Hispanic pepper pot, she could rely on being cast as another “exotic”, such as her appearance on “Father Knows Best” (1954) as an exchange student from India. Because of a dearth of decent material, Moreno as an actress had to play roles in movies that she considered degrading. Among the better pictures she appeared in were the classic Singin’ in the Rain(1952) and The King and I (1956).

Not Speaking Spanish Doesn’t Make You Less Latino

NBCLATINO.COM-San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro stepped into the spotlight with a rousing keynote address. Suddenly everyone wants to know more about him. The broad outlines of his life are intriguing; Castro grew up in a single parent home, the son of a fiery community activist. He is handsome, with a broad smile and an identical twin brother. But aside from his impressive speech, the media has zeroed in on Castro’s language ability, or rather, his lack of it.  He is not fluent in Spanish, which merited headlines inThe Daily Caller and The Huffington Post.  The New York Times called it “a fact he isn’t eager to advertise.” The implication seems to be that Castro is less than authentic because he doesn’t speak perfect Spanish. However, it is pointless and misguided to use language as a litmus test of whether Castro is “really” Latino.  READ MORE

Puerto Rican, Black and Proud Super Model Joan Smalls

During Fashion Week Joan Smalls was named number one super-model.  The Root.com shares a quote from Smalls, “I just have something to prove,” #Puerto Rican-born supermodel Joan Smalls told W Magazine in July. “I know I’m representing a group — Black, #Latin, whatever you want to put me with — and I want to show that they are beautiful the way they are. I think that’s really important for our youth to see.”

Networks Struggle to Appeal to “Hispanics” Without Offending

Ed O’Neill and Sofia Vergara in ABC’s highly rated “Modern Family.” Ms. Vergara plays Gloria Delgado-Pritchett, a sexy Latina trophy wife.

The New York Times: Sofia Vergara is probably the most recognizable Hispanic actress working in English-language television. She is one of the stars of “Modern Family,” among the highest-rated scripted shows on network television, and she has parlayed her celebrity into commercials for brands like Pepsi and Cover Girl.

Despite her popularity, “Modern Family” is not a hit with Hispanic viewers. Out of its overall viewership of 12.9 million, “Modern Family” drew an average of only about 798,000 Hispanic viewers in the season. That audience accounts for only about 6 percent of the show’s viewers — less than half of what you might expect given the 48 million Hispanic television viewers that Nielsen measures. READ MORE

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity

It has been nearly four decades since the United States government mandated the use by federal agencies of the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” to categorize Americans who trace their roots to Spanish-speaking countries, but the labels still haven’t been fully embraced by the group to which they have been affixed.

Only about one-quarter (24%) of Hispanic adults say they most often identify themselves by “Hispanic” or “Latino,” according to a new nationwide survey of Hispanic adults by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center. About half (51%) say they identify themselves most often by their family’s country or place of origin-using such terms as Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Salvadoran or Dominican. And 21% say they use the term “American” most often to describe themselves. The share rises to 40% among those who were born in the U.S. (Read More)

American Central American Actor Maurice Bernard

Maurice Benard (born March 1, 1963) is an American actor. He is known primarily for his iconic portrayal of romantic mobster Michael “Sonny” Corinthos, Jr. on the ABC soap opera, General Hospital, a role he has portrayed since 1993.

Born Mauricio Jose Morales in Martinez, California and growing up in San Francisco, California, Benard is of Salvadorian and Nicaraguan ethnicity. He started his acting career as Nico on the soap opera All My Children from 1987 to 1990. In addition to guest spots on several television series during the early 1990s, Benard also appeared in television movies including the 1991 CBS television movie Lucy & Desi: Before the Laughter, in which he portrayed Desi Arnaz.

Bet you didn’t know just how multi-cultural the character of Sonny Corinthos is supposed to be:

Michael “Sonny” Corinthos, Jr. is born on April 20, 1967[4] in the blue-collar Bensonhurst neighborhood of Brooklyn. His father, Michael “Mike” Corinthos, Sr is of Irish and Greek descent and his mother Adela is Cuban.

Cooking

The character of Sonny Corinthos is quite the ladies man and he loves to cook gourmet dinners for the ladies.  With a multi cultural background like his wouldn’t you like to see what he cooks up?

Info from Wikepedia

Hispanic population growth influencing eating trends in U.S.

The U.S. Census indicates that the Hispanic population is expected to grow 34 percent from 2010 to 2020. Foodservice market research company NPD Group has found that this growth is beginning to influence national consumption patterns.

One of the categories where Hispanics are influencing consumption patterns is at breakfast, according to NPD’s NET (National Eating Trends) Hispanic, which is a year-long study that captures the in-home and away-from-home food and beverage consumption habits of Hispanics in the U.S. by level of acculturation.

For example, NET Hispanic reports that while non-Hispanics include non-toasted bread in 2 percent of their breakfast meals, 12 percent of Hispanics’ breakfasts include non-toasted bread. Throughout the last decade, typical consumers decreased the number of times they include non-toasted bread with their breakfasts. (READ MORE)