Central America: Yuca con Chicharron

The Yuca con Chicharron is a typical dish of Honduras and El Salvador that for preparation Boil the cassava with a little saltChicharon until soft. Prepare the chirmol chopping and mixing diced tomatoes, onion, green pepper and chili pepper, salt, pepper and vinegar or lemon.

Chop cabbage finely and then washed with hot water or chlorinated water.
Cassava can be eaten warm or hot. Place pieces in a bowl and add in order: cabbage, chilmol and finally the pieces of pork .
Leg can also be made ​​with pork in tomato sauce instead of pork or both

Ingredients

2 lbs. Cassava
10 oz. chopped cabbage
chicharron to tasteSauce:
1/4 of tomato sauce
1 pinch of salt
1 pinch of pepper and cumin
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 cube of chicken
1 1/2 cup hot water
onion to taste

See Instructions

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El Salvador: Pan con Pavo Recipe

Pavo, or turkey, is a popular Christmas meal in El Salvador. Salvadoran immigrants to the U.S. often serve it for Thanksgiving as well. The Salvadoran version of roast turkey has a variety of vegetables and spices that are roasted along with the turkey in the roasting pan. This tasty mixture is then pureed and served as a rich sauce to accompany the turkey.  See Recipe

Ayote en Miel Recipe

I was at an international missions dinner by Iglesia Bautista Renacer in Los Angeles with an emphasis on foods from Central and South America.  They have the fundraiser annually.  I was not going to miss an opportunity to support missions and get a taste of Central America and South America.  I tried chao mein of Guatemala, pastellitos of Honduras and for my dessert, had ayote en miel a favorite of Central America made by Salvadoreno cooks.  While I was in Nicaragua a few years ago, I watched women make a cake with ayote.  If you are wondering this recipe taste like then I would compare to candy yams but better.    See Recipe

History of Rompope A Christmas Holiday Drink

¡Salud! [Photographs: María del Mar Sacasa]
From seriouseats.com

Rompope is an eggnog-like drink made with eggsmilk, and vanilla flavouring. The egg yolks impart a yellow hue to the emulsified beverage. It is a traditional drink known as such in Costa RicaEl Salvador and particularly in Mexico, where, it is believed to have been originally made in the convents of the city of Puebla. The word rompope is a derivation of the word rompon, which is used to describe the Spanish version of eggnog that came to Mexico. The Spanish version utilizes rum as its main ingredient, hence the root of both words rom-pon and rom-pope, but in Central America, Guatemala,Honduras and El Salvador, there is also a similar beverage known as rompopo.

Seriouseats.com -The first rompope was brewed by nuns in the Santa Clara convent in Puebla, Mexico in the 17th century, a derivation of Spanish ponche de huevo. At the time, the Catholic Church was prominent in government and society, and convents often hosted visiting officials and religious dignitaries. As such, fine cuisine was developed in the cloisters with the Clarists garnering much acclaim for their confections and sweets.

Rompope is served chilled, often over ice, but, the drink is also popular in Nicaragua, where it is served warm as well.  READ MORE

Learn about the Puerto Rican Holiday Drink Coquito and See Recipe

History of Pupusas

A pupusa (from Pipil pupusawa) is a thick, hand-made corn biscuit-like flat bread (made using masa de maíz, a maize flour dough used in Latin American cuisine) that is stuffed with one or more of the following: cheese (queso) (usually a soft Salvadoran cheese called Quesillo), fried pork meat ground to a paste consistency (Salvadorian chicharrón, not to be confused with fried pork rind which is also known as chicharrón in some other countries), squash (ayote), refried beans (frijoles refritos), or queso con loroco (loroco is a vine flower bud from Central America). There is also the pupusa revuelta with mixed ingredients, such as queso (cheese), frijoles (beans), [1], and chicharrón or bacon. Pupusas are similar to tortillas and especially to arepas. In fact, in El Salvador, normal tortillas are about the same diameter and thickness as pupusas, without the filling.

Making pupusas.

Making pupusas.

History:

Pupusas also known as Pupisio were first created by the Pipil tribes which dwelled in the territory which is now known as El Salvador. Cooking implements for their preparation have been found in Joya de Cerén, “El Salvador’s Pompeii”, site of a native village that was buried by ashes from a volcano explosion, and where foodstuffs were preserved as they were being cooked almost two thousand years ago. The instruments for their preparation have also been found in other archaeological sites in El Salvador.

Cooking pupusas

Cooking pupusas

In the late 1950s, pupusas were still not widespread across El Salvador, and were mostly localized in the central towns, such as Quezaltepeque, and cities of the country. As the population started to migrate to other areas, pupusas stands started to proliferate in the 1960s across the country and in the neighboring areas of Honduras and Guatemala, sometimes with variations in shape, size or filling. In Guatemala during the 1970s, pupusas had a half-moon shape. The half mooned shape would be considered a half eaten pupusa in the Chalatenango area, fish pupusas were uncommon, and pupusas served east of the Lempa river usually had a much larger diameter.

In the 1980s, the Salvadorian civil war forced a Salvadorian migration to other countries, mainly the United States. Therefore, pupusas became available outside the country wherever a Salvadorian community was found. In the United States, immigrants have brought the dish to Florida, New York, California, Iowa, Chicago, Nevada, North Carolina (especially Durham, North Carolina), Maryland, Virginia, Washington, D.C., Texas, East Boston, New Jersey, Nebraska, Lancaster, PA, St. Paul, Minnesota, Northwest Arkansas, Columbus, OH, Atlanta, Portland,OR, Nashville, TN and other locations, where there are now many pupuserías (a place where pupusas are sold and made). In Canada, pupuserías may be found in Toronto, (North York and City of York), Kensington Market, Southern Ontario, Eastern Ontario, Montréal, Québec, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Alberta and in Vancouver, BC.

Both at home and abroad, pupusas are traditionally served with curtido (a pickled cabbage relish, similar to German sauerkraut and Korean kimchi that comes in mild and spicy varieties) and tomato sauce, which are traditionally eaten by hand.-(Wikepedia)