Mexican Street Style Bacon Wrapped Hot Dog

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Photo by Crystal Johnson 

If you’ve ever walked through the streets of Los Angeles late at night, you may have been lucky enough to happen upon a street vendor selling bacon-wrapped hot dogs piled high with caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, pico de gallo, avocado, ketchup, mustard and mayonnaise. This version of Mexican hot dogs, also known as street dogs or Los Angeles hot dogs, is believed to be a riff on a similar recipe that originated in Sonora, Mexico.   READ MORE.

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE HOT DOGS:

  • 8 hot dogs
  • 8 bacon strips
  • 4 jalapeños, stemmed, halved lengthwise and seeds removed (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for drizzling (if needed)
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ small red bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • ½ small green bell pepper, thinly sliced
  •  Kosher salt
  • 8 hot dog buns
  •  Ketchup, yellow mustard and mayonnaise, for serving

 

 

About Guajillo Chiles with Dave Miller

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A guajillo chili or guajillo chile is the dried form of mirasol chili, a landrace variety of chile pepper of the species Capsicum annuum, and is the second-most commonly used dried chili in Mexican cuisine after poblanos. The Mexican state of Zacatecas is one of the main producers of guajillo chilies.

Small amounts of Guajillo chiles are used in Mexican cooking to add flavor, mild heat and color. They’re frequently used in pastes or rubs to flavor all kinds of meats, especially chicken. In addition to Mexican moles use this chile in enchiladas, salsas, sauces, soups, stews and tamales.

 

 

Arroz Rojo y Bistec en Salsa Roja

BeFunky-collage.jpgMeet Romey,  a 14-year-old who loves to cook.   Proud of her Mexican heritage, she takes on making a dish her mom commonly makes, Arroz Rojo y bistec en salsa roja.  For those of us who don’t speak Spanish well that translates to red rice and steak in red sauce.

Food Truck Wednesdays in Maryland

Hooray for Wednesdays! Yay! Fun! Fun! Fun! 

Why the cheers for the week’s “get over the hump day?” Well, it’s because in Maryland, there are tantalizing tastes just waiting to be discovered at Food Truck Wednesdays. This fiesta of food happens every Wednesday from spring to the end of October at the Arbutus Volunteer Fire Department in Arbutus, MD and Red Lion Hotel’s parking lot in Timonium, MD. 

The food trucks include all kinds of scrumptious local and international cuisine including: soul-food, Greek, Mexican, Korean, Indian and even dessert trucks. Here are just some of the food trucks who frequent the event:

  • The Gypsy Queen
  • Greek on the Street
  • Beef on the Street
  • Wanna Pizza This
  • Kommie Pig
  • Jimmy’s Famous Seafood
  • Farm to Charm
  • Mexican on the Run
  • Deja Roux

The Multi Cultural Cooking Network had the opportunity to catch up with one of the founders of the event, Chad Houck of H2 Markets. What a chat! We talked to him about the origins of the event, how the trucks are selected and what to expect in the coming months. Check out the interview above, and find out more information about Food Truck Wednesdays by going to FoodTruckNites.com.

Photo and video provided by Foundation Media Services

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Eat your food on the run at Food Truck Wednesdays. Here is a Korean Beef BBQ Wrap from the Gypsy Queen food truck

 

 

Cookbook Spotlight: Sabores Yucatecos -Spanish Version

Chef Gilberto(L) with Chef Angel at tasting of Sabores Yucatecos Cookbook recipes.

Chef Gilberto(L) with Chef Angel at tasting of Sabores Yucatecos Cookbook recipes.

Chef Gilberto Centina , owner the Los Angeles restaurant Chichen Itza presents his new cookbook Sabores Yucatecos, the Spanish version.   An English version of the book was published first. The acclaimed cookbook won the First Place Award for Best Cookbook in the Latino Literacy Now’s 2013 International Latino Book Awards. The English version was the first cookbook written of it’s kind with a focus on cuisine of the Yucatan.

Chef Gilberto was born and reared in Tizmin located in the Yucatan of Mexico. As a kid he grew up helping his mom prepare delicious meals. The inspiring aromas woke up passion for cooking. However, as an adult Chef Gilberto sought work and successfully began working in engineering but the passion for cooking was still there. Eventually, he moved to the United States and began working in the culinary industry perfecting his abilities in the culinary arts. In 2001 he open his restaurant Chichen Itza.

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MCCN’s editor and I have both gotten the opportunity to taste the spectacular cuisine of Chef Gilberto. We hope your attempt at trying the recipes from Sabores Yucatecos allows you to truly experience Chef Gilberto’s creativity and richly flavorful food.

 

Written by Chef Angel Marquez.

Capirotada, Mexican Bread Pudding for Lent

Recipe & Article From HomeSickTexan.blogspot.com-  I did not grow up eating capirotada. Truth be told, I had never even heard of it until a Capriotadafew years ago when I was at a Mexican restaurant on a Lenten Friday. “Hay capirotada,” was written on a chalkboard and curious what it was, I ordered some. The waitress brought me a small plate with a dessert made of toasted bread slices drenched in a sweet and spicy syrup. It was soft and sticky, but there were crunchy almonds, chewy raisins and a creamy tang to keep it from becoming cloying. Capirotada? I was in love!

 Capirotada Ingredients

  • 1 24-inch loaf of French bread, cubed and toasted (about six cups)
  • 2 cups of brown sugar or 16 oz. of piloncillo
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup of shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1 cup of pecans, toasted and chopped
  • 1/2 cup of raisins
  • ½ cup of dried apricots, chopped
  • 1/4 cup of butter, melted

READ MORE FOR ARTICLE AND RECIPE INSTRUCTIONS

Pozole/Posole Recipe

Pozole (Nahuatl: potzolli, which means “foamy”; variant spellings: pozolé, pozolli, posole) is a ritually significant, traditional pre-Columbian pozolesoup or stew from Mexico. Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún’s “General History of the Things of New Spain” circa 1500 CE. It is made from nixtamalized cacahuazintle corn, with meat, usually pork, chicken, turkey, pork rinds, chili peppers, and other seasonings and garnish.[3] Vegetarian and vegan versions also exist.

Ingredients for Posole

12 dried long red chile
10 lbs. Boned pork roast cut into 1″ cubes
1/2 head of garlic peeled and chopped
A large pinch of Mexican oregano
1/2 of a large onion, chopped
Large can hominy
Salt

Preparation

Break open the chiles and remove the seeds and veins. Put the chiles to cook in a medium sized pot. Cover with fresh water and gently boil until chiles are very soft. Let the mixture cool and using a favorite method, blend the chile and the water to make a paste and strain.

Meanwhile, put the cubed pork, oregano, garlic, onion and salt into a large heavy pot and cover with water. Boil meat gently for 30 minutes. When the meat is soft, add the chile and hominy and cook for 15 to 20 minutes until the mixture is boiling nicely.

To serve, ladle the posole into heavy bowls and serve with thinly sliced cabbage and radishes, quartered limes, oregano, chopped onion, and fresh corn tortillas. Besides these side dishes, posole is usually served with sodas or cervesas.

Recipe from SouthernNewMexico.com

Mexican Pastry: Conchas Recipe

From La Monarca Bakery in Los Angeles- Chocolate Conchas

Conchas (Shells) are a Mexican pastry that is famous for its shape of a shell. The pastry contains a sugar shell pattern on the top. This is one of the most famous Mexican pastries recognized in the United States.It is also referred to as “pan de huevo.”  See Recipe

Mexico: About Pan de Muerto

The pan de muerto (Spanish for Bread of the dead) (also called pan de los muertos) is a type of sweet roll traditionally baked inMexico during the weeks leading up to the Día de los Muertos, which is celebrated on November 1 and 2. It is a sweetened soft bread shaped like a bun, often decorated with bone-like pieces. Pan de muerto is eaten on Día de los Muertos, at the gravesite or altar of the deceased. In some regions it is eaten for months before the official celebration of Dia de los Muertos. In Oaxaca, pan de muerto is the same bread that is usually baked, with the addition of decorations. As part of the celebration, loved ones eat pan de muerto as well as the relative’s favorite foods. The bones represent the lost one (difuntos or difuntas) and there is normally a baked tear drop on the bread to represent sorrow. The bones are represented in a circle to portray the circle of life.

Photo courtesy of http://GabrielasKitchen.com