Cookbook Spotlight: Sabores Yucatecos -Spanish Version

Chef Gilberto(L) with Chef Angel at tasting of Sabores Yucatecos Cookbook recipes.

Chef Gilberto(L) with Chef Angel at tasting of Sabores Yucatecos Cookbook recipes.

Chef Gilberto Centina , owner the Los Angeles restaurant Chichen Itza presents his new cookbook Sabores Yucatecos, the Spanish version.   An English version of the book was published first. The acclaimed cookbook won the First Place Award for Best Cookbook in the Latino Literacy Now’s 2013 International Latino Book Awards. The English version was the first cookbook written of it’s kind with a focus on cuisine of the Yucatan.

Chef Gilberto was born and reared in Tizmin located in the Yucatan of Mexico. As a kid he grew up helping his mom prepare delicious meals. The inspiring aromas woke up passion for cooking. However, as an adult Chef Gilberto sought work and successfully began working in engineering but the passion for cooking was still there. Eventually, he moved to the United States and began working in the culinary industry perfecting his abilities in the culinary arts. In 2001 he open his restaurant Chichen Itza.

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MCCN’s editor and I have both gotten the opportunity to taste the spectacular cuisine of Chef Gilberto. We hope your attempt at trying the recipes from Sabores Yucatecos allows you to truly experience Chef Gilberto’s creativity and richly flavorful food.

 

Written by Chef Angel Marquez.

Capirotada, Mexican Bread Pudding for Lent

Recipe & Article From HomeSickTexan.blogspot.com-  I did not grow up eating capirotada. Truth be told, I had never even heard of it until a Capriotadafew years ago when I was at a Mexican restaurant on a Lenten Friday. “Hay capirotada,” was written on a chalkboard and curious what it was, I ordered some. The waitress brought me a small plate with a dessert made of toasted bread slices drenched in a sweet and spicy syrup. It was soft and sticky, but there were crunchy almonds, chewy raisins and a creamy tang to keep it from becoming cloying. Capirotada? I was in love!

 Capirotada Ingredients

  • 1 24-inch loaf of French bread, cubed and toasted (about six cups)
  • 2 cups of brown sugar or 16 oz. of piloncillo
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup of shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1 cup of pecans, toasted and chopped
  • 1/2 cup of raisins
  • ½ cup of dried apricots, chopped
  • 1/4 cup of butter, melted

READ MORE FOR ARTICLE AND RECIPE INSTRUCTIONS

Pozole/Posole Recipe

Pozole (Nahuatl: potzolli, which means “foamy”; variant spellings: pozolé, pozolli, posole) is a ritually significant, traditional pre-Columbian pozolesoup or stew from Mexico. Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún’s “General History of the Things of New Spain” circa 1500 CE. It is made from nixtamalized cacahuazintle corn, with meat, usually pork, chicken, turkey, pork rinds, chili peppers, and other seasonings and garnish.[3] Vegetarian and vegan versions also exist.

Ingredients for Posole

12 dried long red chile
10 lbs. Boned pork roast cut into 1″ cubes
1/2 head of garlic peeled and chopped
A large pinch of Mexican oregano
1/2 of a large onion, chopped
Large can hominy
Salt

Preparation

Break open the chiles and remove the seeds and veins. Put the chiles to cook in a medium sized pot. Cover with fresh water and gently boil until chiles are very soft. Let the mixture cool and using a favorite method, blend the chile and the water to make a paste and strain.

Meanwhile, put the cubed pork, oregano, garlic, onion and salt into a large heavy pot and cover with water. Boil meat gently for 30 minutes. When the meat is soft, add the chile and hominy and cook for 15 to 20 minutes until the mixture is boiling nicely.

To serve, ladle the posole into heavy bowls and serve with thinly sliced cabbage and radishes, quartered limes, oregano, chopped onion, and fresh corn tortillas. Besides these side dishes, posole is usually served with sodas or cervesas.

Recipe from SouthernNewMexico.com

Mexican Pastry: Conchas Recipe

From La Monarca Bakery in Los Angeles- Chocolate Conchas

Conchas (Shells) are a Mexican pastry that is famous for its shape of a shell. The pastry contains a sugar shell pattern on the top. This is one of the most famous Mexican pastries recognized in the United States.It is also referred to as “pan de huevo.”  See Recipe

Mexico: About Pan de Muerto

The pan de muerto (Spanish for Bread of the dead) (also called pan de los muertos) is a type of sweet roll traditionally baked inMexico during the weeks leading up to the Día de los Muertos, which is celebrated on November 1 and 2. It is a sweetened soft bread shaped like a bun, often decorated with bone-like pieces. Pan de muerto is eaten on Día de los Muertos, at the gravesite or altar of the deceased. In some regions it is eaten for months before the official celebration of Dia de los Muertos. In Oaxaca, pan de muerto is the same bread that is usually baked, with the addition of decorations. As part of the celebration, loved ones eat pan de muerto as well as the relative’s favorite foods. The bones represent the lost one (difuntos or difuntas) and there is normally a baked tear drop on the bread to represent sorrow. The bones are represented in a circle to portray the circle of life.

Photo courtesy of http://GabrielasKitchen.com

Horchata, the History Plus Spanish & Mexican Recipes

In the USA, we are use to seeing Mexican style horchata which is made from rice; however,  the original and ancient recipe is

The light beverage is horchata.

made from chufa(tiger nut).  Pronounced [CHOO-fuh], the tiny, tuberous roots of a Middle-Eastern plant of the sedge family, chufa “nuts” have their origin in ancient Egypt. Chufa was one of the first domesticated crops and in fact, was found in vases in the tombs of the ancient Egyptian pharos. The chufa nut was widely used in Egypt and Sudan. The Arabs introduced the plant to Spain during the time of the Moorish kings (700 B.C. a 1200 A.D.). The eastern Spanish province of Valencia was the best for growing chufa.The nut is good for your health, with high levels of iron and potassium. It does not contain sodium and is valued for its minerals and vitamins.(-xmission.com)

Ingredients

  • 1 kg chufas
  • 1 kg Sugar
  • 5 liters of Water
  • 1 Cinamon stick

Click to See Directions

History of Rompope A Christmas Holiday Drink

¡Salud! [Photographs: María del Mar Sacasa]
From seriouseats.com

Rompope is an eggnog-like drink made with eggsmilk, and vanilla flavouring. The egg yolks impart a yellow hue to the emulsified beverage. It is a traditional drink known as such in Costa RicaEl Salvador and particularly in Mexico, where, it is believed to have been originally made in the convents of the city of Puebla. The word rompope is a derivation of the word rompon, which is used to describe the Spanish version of eggnog that came to Mexico. The Spanish version utilizes rum as its main ingredient, hence the root of both words rom-pon and rom-pope, but in Central America, Guatemala,Honduras and El Salvador, there is also a similar beverage known as rompopo.

Seriouseats.com -The first rompope was brewed by nuns in the Santa Clara convent in Puebla, Mexico in the 17th century, a derivation of Spanish ponche de huevo. At the time, the Catholic Church was prominent in government and society, and convents often hosted visiting officials and religious dignitaries. As such, fine cuisine was developed in the cloisters with the Clarists garnering much acclaim for their confections and sweets.

Rompope is served chilled, often over ice, but, the drink is also popular in Nicaragua, where it is served warm as well.  READ MORE

Learn about the Puerto Rican Holiday Drink Coquito and See Recipe

Oaxacan Black Mole Recipe

Guelaguetza is a popular Oaxacan Restaurant in Los Angeles.  Oaxaca, Mexico  is known as the land of the 7 Moles.   Here is one of the seven mole, Guelaguetza’s Black Mole( Mole Negra) Recipe:   

Black Mole Recipe – Serves 4

  • 1 lb. Guelaguetza’s black Mole Paste
  • 2 lbs. red tomatoes – cut in fours
  • ½ cup of Water
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon Oaxacan chocolate (can substitute with brown sugar)

SEE DIRECTIONS

Click Here to Learn a little more about Mole from expert makers

The Process of Making Mezcal in Oaxaca, Mexico

Mezcal, or mescal, is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from the maguey plant (a form of agave, Agave americana) native to Mexico. The word mezcal comes from Nahuatl metl and ixcalli which mean ‘oven cooked agave.

The maguey grows in many parts of Mexico, though most mezcal is made in Oaxaca. There is a saying attributed to Oaxaca regarding the drink: “para todo mal, mezcal, y para todo bien también” (for everything bad, mezcal, and for everything good, as well.) READ MORE

Dave Miller of Multi Cultural Cooking Network walks you the process of producing Mezcal at the Wahaka Distillery in Oaxaca Mexico.