In Season :Oysters in Winter

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Chef Collaborative Blog -Just like a vegetable, oysters have historically been produced in certain seasons.  Oysters have typically been a winter delicacy, as colder waters encourage oysters to store glycogen, a carbohydrate compound that taste like sugar, in order to survive the dormant months when water temperature drops below 40 degrees.  As glycogen accumulates, oysters get plumper and sweeter.  However, when water temperatures rise, the oyster focuses its energy on enlarging its gonad in order to create reproductive material.  The oyster becomes less meaty and, thus, less tasty.  During summer or spawning the oyster becomes slimy and milky.  These oysters are edible but the taste and texture appeals to no one. READ MORE

Oysters Rockefeller Recipe

Watch How to Shuck An Oyster

Travel: Where to Dine in Myrtle Beach

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As soon as Memorial Day  hits, Myrtle Beach is one of the favorite destinations for USA East Coast folks.  It is very family oriented.  Off of Kings Highway there are rides.    There are lots of theaters. There are no shortage of seafood restaurants and especially seafood buffets.

I dined at a restaurant which looks like a house called the Sea Captain Restaurant.  I order the seafood platter consisting of small tasty hush puppies, flavorful fried oysters, flounder and shrimp.  All the seafood tastes fresh.   My dining companion ordered the Lemon Curd pie for dessert.  This is a restaurant with a view of the Atlantic Ocean. – Report from Patsy Johnson of Norfolk, VA.

 

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Sea Captain Restaurant Website: http://www.seacaptains.com/index.html

Foodie Vacation Destination- Savannah, Georgia

History of Oysters Rockefeller and Recipe

Oysters Rockefeller was created at the New Orleans restaurant Antoine’s. Antoine’s was founded in 1840 by Antoine Alciatore, who moved to New Orleans after two frustrating years in New York to open a restaurant of his own. It is the country’s oldest family-run restaurant. The dish was created in 1899 by Jules Alciatore, son of the restaurant’s founder.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had Oysters Rockefeller at Antoine’s in 1937. Mayor Robert Maestri commented to Roosevelt “How you like dem erstas?”, as the national press transcribed Maestri’s Yat accent.

The dish was named Oysters Rockefeller after John D. Rockefeller, the richest American at the time, for the richness of the sauce. The original recipe is a secret, the sauce is known to be a puree of a number of green vegetables other than spinach. It consists of oysters on the half-shell topped with the sauce and bread crumbs and then baked.[citation needed] Jules Alciatore developed Oysters Rockefeller in the face of a shortage of French snails, substituting the locally available oysters for snails. Antoine’s has been serving the original recipe dish since 1899. It is estimated that Antoine’s has served over three million, five hundred thousand orders

See Recipe

*Read more at Wikepedia

Filipino Escbeche(Sweet & Sour Fish)

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image from ang sarap

When you are covering the world, you need a little help.  If you love Filipino food, can’t get enough of  Filipino culture then check out thephilippineisland.com.  Here is a favorite cultural dish.- Crystal Johnson, MCCN

The ingredients would be as follows:

    • 2-3 lbs red snapper, whole fish
    • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
    • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
    • 1/2 cup apple cidar vinegar or white vinegar
    • ¼ water
    • 1/2 cup brown sugar
    • 1 large chopped onion
    • 6 tablespoons minced garlic
    • 1/2 cup ginger, julienned
    • 1/2 cup carrot, julienned
    • 1/2 cup red bell pepper
    • 1/2 cup scallion, julienned (spring onions)
    • 1 tablespoon sifted flour

Directions

  1. Clean the fish and slit it open. Let it stand for few minutes and drain well.
  2. Sprinkle fish with 1 tbsp salt.
  3. In a medium skillet, heat the oil and fry the fish until brown. Remove the fish from the pan and set aside.
  4. In the same skillet, sauté the garlic until light brown, then sauté onion.
  5. Add salt and white pepper. Stir in ginger, scallions, carrot and red bell pepper.
  6. Add soy sauce, vinegar, water and sugar. Salt and pepper to taste.
  7. When the mixture boils, add flour to thicken. Then, add the fish.
  8. Cover the skillet and simmer for 5 minutes

Fish Serre (Garifuna Dish)

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  • Boil salt beef in 2 cups water until tender
  • Clean fish, wash with lime juice or vinegar.
  • Cut each fish in serving pieces and season with salt and pepper.
  • Grate coconut.
  • Add 2 cups water and squeeze to get thick milk. (Set aside) 5

Prepare vegetables. (Cover and set aside)  Put milk in sauce pan. Stir constantly until milk reaches boiling point. Add salt meat, onion, plantain or bananas. Cook until tender.  Add carrots and fish. Simmer until fish is tender. Taste for seasoning. Serve hot with white rice.

This recipe found at: http://www.recipehound.com/Recipes/Recipes2/7636.html

This recipe found at: http://www.recipehound.com/Recipes/Recipes2/7636.html

Mediterranean Fish Recipe

Mediterranean Medley Cooking with Michelle Karam

*Recipe by Michelle Karam

Ingredients

  • 1-2 Lbs of Fish (Chilean Sea Bass, Branzino) Any flaky white fish will
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper Sliced A Handful of Small Cherry Tomatoes Halved
  •  1 Leek Quartered and Sliced
  • 2 Tbs. Capers
  • (Optionsl) Juice from 1 Lemon
  •  ¼ Cup Dry White Wine
  • 1 ½ Tsp of Old Bay Seasoning A Sprinkle of Fresh Herbs Can Use Either Fresh Dill, Cilantro, Basil

 COOKING DIRECTIONS:

SPRAY THE BOTTOM OF YOUR PYREX DISH WITH PAM OR SOME SORT OF COOKING SPRAY- PLACE FISH IN THE PYREX- PUT ALL OF THE INGREDIENTS ON TOP OF THE FISH- SEASONINGS, VEGETABLES, HERBS, WINE, LEMON JUICE, CAPERS, ETC…. COVER WITH ALUMINUM FOIL AND COOK IN THE OVEN ON 400 FOR 18 TO 30 MIN- DEPENDING ON HOW THICK YOUR PIECE OF FISH IS- THERE SHOULD BE A LOT OF JUICES ON THE BOTTOM- THEN PUT THE OVEN ON BROIL- REMOVE THE FOIL AND PLACE THE FISH UNDER THE BROILER FOR 5 MINUTES- UNTIL THE FISH GETS A LITTLE GOLDEN BROWN ON TOP- SERVE WITH RICE OR MASHED POTATOES.

See Video of Michelle preparing hummus: https://multiculturalcookingnetwork.wordpress.com/2009/12/05/mediterranean-medley-how-to-make-hummus/

Sylvia of Harlem’s Sassy Catfish- Low fat Cooking

Makes 4 servings

Preparation time: 10 min.

Cooking time: 12 min.

Ingredients:

  •  ½ cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, granular
  • 1 cup tomato puree
  •  1 cup Sylvia’s Hot Sauce*
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 stalks celery, cut julienne style
  •  ½ cup diced onion
  •  ½ cup diced green bell pepper
  • 2 lemons sliced
  • 4 (4-oz.) catfish fillets
  •  ½ teaspoon salt
  •  ½ teaspoon pepper
  •  ½ teaspoon Sylvia’s Secret Seasoning*
  •  2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions:

Combine Splenda granular, tomato puree, Sylvia’s Hot Sauce, water, celery, onion, green bell pepper and lemons in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly; reduce heat and simmer five to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Sprinkle fillets evenly with salt, pepper and Sylvia’s Secret Seasoning. Saute fillets in hot olive oil, in a large skillet, over medium heat for two minutes on each side. Pour sauce over fish; simmer two additional minutes or until fish flakes with a fork. Serve immediately. *Hot sauce or salt-free herb seasoning may be substituted for Sylvia’s Hot Sauce and Sylvia’s Secret Seasoning. For that special flavor, look for Sylvia’s Hot Sauce and Sylvia’s Secret Seasoning at your local market or order online.

Sylvia’s Sassy Catfish

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Nutrition information per serving:  Serving Size: 1/4 recipe Calories 300 Calories from Fat 140 Total Fat 16g Saturated Fat 3g Cholesterol 55mg Sodium 900mg Total Carbohydrate 20g Dietary Fiber 2g Sugars 8g Protein 19g Dietary exchanges: 1 Starch, 2 Med fat meat, I reg, 1 fat This recipe, when compared to a traditional recipe, has a 22 percent reduction in calories, a 53 percent reduction in carbohydrates and a 76 percent reduction in sugars.

Sylvia Woods is a compensated spokeswoman for Splenda Corp

The Seafood of Norway

The one traditional Norwegian dish with a claim to international popularity is the smoked salmon. It is now a major export, and could be considered the most important Norwegian contribution to modern international cuisine. Smoked salmon exists traditionally in many varieties, and is often served with scrambled eggs, dill, sandwiches or mustard sauce. Close to smoked salmon is gravlaks, (literally “dug salmon”), which is salt-and-sugar-cured salmon seasoned with dill and (optionally) other herbs and spices. Gravlaks is often sold under more sales-friendly names internationally. A more peculiar Norwegian fish dish is Rakfisk, which consists of fermented trout, a culinary relation of Swedish surströmming.

Until the 20th century, shellfish was not eaten to any extent. This partly due to the abundance of fish and the relative high cost of time to catch shellfish over nutritional value, and that such food spoils rather quickly, even in a northern climate. However, prawns, crabs and mussels have become quite popular, especially during summer. Lobster is of course popular, but restrictions on the catch (size and season) limits the consumption, and in addition lobster has become rather rare, and indeed expensive.

People will gather for “krabbelag” (“crab party”) feasts, either eating ready cooked crabs from a fishmonger, or cooking live crabs in a large pan. This is typically done outdoors, the style being rather rustic with only bread, mayonnaise and wedges of lemon to go with the crab. Crabs are caught in pots by both professionals and amateurs, prawns are caught by small trawlers and sold ready cooked at the quays. It is popular to buy half a kilo of prawns and eat it at the quays, feeding the waste to seagulls. Beer or white wine is the normal accompaniment.-(Wikepedia)

Classic Baltimore Dining: Mt. Washington Tavern

Fine Foods, Beverages & Conviviality……..

Mt. Washington Tavern

It was quite a few years ago now that a likeable and somewhat courageous group of people set out to create the best original restaurant they knew how.  The Mt. Washington Tavern quickly became a comfortable neighborhood eatery; a common for debate and chatter at day’s end, and the proper environment for those special lunches, dinners and late night suppings.

Now in our 30th year, there is great pride in our growing reputation for great homemade food, inventive chefs, heavy handed bartenders, and an atmosphere that makes you happy to be in Baltimore.

Our interior decor and multiple motifs reflect the pride that we have in our city and the escapist destination dining that you seek in a night on the town.  The prints, paintings, and engravings on the walls were all carefully selected to create a Baltimore ambiance.  Painted by Carol Offutt, the mural on the West wall depicts the old club house that stood at Pimlico Race Course, which, before it was destroyed by fire in 1966, was one of the most cherished landmarks in all of American racing.  The chandeliers that hang over the bar date from 1889 and originally hung in the lobby of the old Gayiety Theatre on East Baltimore St.  Even our antique wooden telephone booth is a relic from a famous downtown drugstore.  The etched windows between the Front and Raw Bars feature scenes particularly relevant to Baltimore and its heritage.

*The Building has been declared a historic landmark.

*Food Note-It’s Baltimore, Crabcakes are on the menu.

There was a fire in 2011. The restaurant will re-open in November 2012

Website: http://mtwashingtontavern.com/

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