LA Street Food Fest from a Vegetarian Perspective

In 2012 Veronica Herrera attended the LA Street Food Festival.  Her perspective is that of a vegetarian.   The annual festival takes place at the Rose Bowl, featuring LA’s Best Food Truck and street vendors.   Your ticket is a all access pass to a taste of LA.  Some portions are pretty small while others are an adequate style.  After all,  you get to linger and nibble all day.  Moreover, the LA Street Festival like MCCN is a taste of the world from Indonesia to Mexico to Southern Barbecue.    Expect frozen desserts, cupcakes, drinks and other items to choose from.

It is a great event.

 SEE FULL REPORT

http://multiculturalcookingnetwork.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=2221:4th-annual-la-street-food-fest 

See our photo album on facebook

Advertisements

Taste of Oaxaca, Mexico 2011

This is a trip you don’t want to miss.  If you are foodie or know the ultimate foodie then book the tickets.  It’s the perfect gift and experience.  Travel with the Multi Cultural Cooking Network and experience the sights, the culture and the world famous cuisne of Oaxaca, Mexico. Your guide, Dave Miller has been facilitating groups in Mexico for over 20 years.

Click Below to See Brochure.  September Flyer Revision

New York Vendy Awards

The battle to be named the City’s top sidewalk chef is on. Competing for hungry New Yorkers every day, these road warriors work long hours in cramped conditions; many are immigrants passionately re-creating specialties from home.

Click Here For Listing of Vendy Winners

See Video From this Year’s New York Vendy’s with a few Philadelphia guest trucks.

Yamashiro Garden Market Series: Wine Tasting

 

 

There’s a new Garden Market perched in the Hollywood Hills.  Nick Spano manages the market and his vision is not your grandma’s farmer’s market.  Afterall this is Hollywood, the “H” in Hip put on the map in this town.  Spano knows how to make going to a Garden market a deliciously entertaining experience.

Moreover, the Yamashiro Garden Market is a Multi-cultural experience.  Italian gelatos, Australian Coffee, gourmet tacos with an Asian twist, and German foods at it’s Wurst(That’s good).

Yamishiro Garden Market Webside One: Wine Tasting

The New York Food Scene from Fine Dining to Street Food

Photo by Multi Cultural Cooking Network

Once, I watched a documentary revealing the perception of  many people from all over the world in regards to the United States.  The conclusion is there is New York and then there is the rest of the United States. No place is quite like the fashion, food and cultural capital.    Those

photo by Multiculturalcookingnetwork.com

Yankees,  the smell of pretzels on the streets of Manhattan, bagels, pizza, the Appollo and course that accent help to make New York one of the stand out places in the world.

Street Food and Pizza Shops:

As a New Yorker who happens to live in Los Angeles, I fondly recollect some of the food of New York especially the street food and pizza shops.  The zeppola, jamaican beef pattie and thin crust pizza are classic New York to be found in Italian Pizza shops.  Shisk ka bobs, and hot roasted nuts add flavorful scent to brisk New York air.

Fine Dining:

Moreover, New York is known for having the best restaurants in the world such as Tavern on the Green, Union Square Cafe, The Russian Tea Room, The Rainbow Room and more.

Tavern on the Green

Best Neighborhoods for dining:

*The East Village and Williamsburg in Brooklyn are considered among the best neighborhoods to dine.

Article by Crystal A. Johnson

Trinidad: Give me some doubles! (by Monica Johnson)

(Recipe by www.theonefour.com)

doubles, Trinidadian doubles, channa, bara

Doubles are sold as a convenient meal by street vendors in Trinidad and Tobago

If you go to Trinidad, you are sure to see this snack sold by street vendors. It’s called doubles. Doubles are said to have East Indian roots. Many East Indians, newly released from being indentured servants, chose to stay in Trinidad instead of returning to India; therefore, they needed a way to make money. Ever-enterprising, they set up small stalls to sell whatever they could, which just happened to include curried and fried channa (chick peas) in small paper cones. Later on, as the story goes, a vendor discovered that adding bara (East Indian fried bread) would make a nice little meal.

So now you’re wondering how did the name doubles come about, right? There’s always a story. So here it goes! The bara along with the channa caught on so well that people began asking the vendors to double up on the bara. And through the creativity of slang, the request was shortened to just asking for “doubles.” Now doubles are sold on wax paper for a quicker more cost-effective way of serving customers. See the recipe for doubles below.

Barra

2 cups of flour

1/2 tsp salt

1 teaspoon curry powder

1 teaspoon cumin

1/2 tsp ground pepper

1 teaspoon yeast

1/3 cup warm water

1/4 tsp sugar

1/4 cup oil for frying

Channa Curry

2 cups of chickpeas, canned or soaked over night and boiled until tender.

1 tablespoon curry powder

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 onion, sliced

1 tablespoon oil

2 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground allspice (if you have it)

1 tsp Pepper sauce

2 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

Instructions:

  • In a small bowl place the warm water, sugar and yeast and set to sponge for 5 minutes. In a large bowl combine the flour, salt, curry powder and cumin. Add the yeast mixture and enough water to make a slightly firm dough. Knead until the dough is no longer sticky, adding flour if necessary. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and allow to rise for an hour.
  • For the filling, heat the oil in a heavy skillet, saute the onions until they are translucent, and then add the garlic and spices. Saute for another minute or so and then add the water. Add the chickpeas and let simmer for 15-20 minutes. Add pepper sauce and season to taste
  • The dough should be punched down and allowed to sit for 10 minutes. To shape the bara, take 1 tablespoon of the dough and flatten to a round, 4 or 5 inches in diameter.
  • Wet your hands so that the dough won’t stick to them but not so much as to make the dough too wet to fry.
  • Fry the baras in hot oil until puffy (about 15 seconds per side), turning once and drain on kitchen paper. When all are cooked, fill with channa by placing a heaping tablespoon of the cooked filling on each bara and top with cucumbers and hot pepper sauce.

Historical information taken from Amazing-Trinidad-Vacations.com