Stella Rosa Moscato

Serving wine at the LA Street Food Festival

Serving wine at the LA Street Food Festival

MCCN staffers got a chance to try the  Stella Rosa #Moscato.  Two of us found that it was crisp and not too sweet. Although, we had one dissenter of three from MCCN who was not a fan and found the wine to be too sweet for her taste.   From MCCN editor, “Cheers with Stella Rosa Moscato. ”

Stella

MCCN Editor

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Ask the Expert: Wine Choice Pairings for Mexican Food

Ever been stumped on how to pair your Mexican food with wine beyond the basics of white goes with chicken and red goes with meat?  Well, with Mexican food there are various spices to take into account that makes the pairing need a little more thought.

MCCN Contributor/Dave’s Mexico Blogger Dave Miller catches up with Wine Expert Ed Draves.

 

Gabrielle Union launches a new Chardonnay

It feels like we are doing a commercial for her but Gabrielle has done her dues and is all the rage with the hit series Being Mary Jane.  Now the actress  has wine out called Vanilla Pudding wine.    She announced her wine on instagram saying, ““So excited about my new wine @vanillapuddinwine … It’s a fun Chardonnay with hints of vanilla, super yummy and great for all occasions. Available for purchase at http://www.vanillapuddinwine.com Enjoy.”

Ice Wines: Canada and Germany Main Producers

ice wine grapes

Wikipedia-Ice wine (or icewine; German Eiswein) is a type of dessert wine produced from grapes that have been frozen while still on the vine. The sugars and other dissolved solids do not freeze, but the water does, allowing a more concentrated grape must to be pressed from the frozen grapes, resulting in a smaller amount of more concentrated, very sweet wine.

With ice wines, the freezing happens before the fermentation, not afterwards. Unlike the grapes from which other dessert wines are made, such as Sauternes, Tokaji, or Trockenbeerenauslese, ice wine grapes should not be affected by Botrytis cinerea or noble rot, at least not to any great degree. Only healthy grapes keep in good shape until the opportunity arises for an ice wine harvest, which in extreme cases can occur after the New Year, on a northern hemisphere calendar. This gives ice wine its characteristic refreshing sweetness balanced by high acidity. When the grapes are free of Botrytis, they are said to come in “clean”.

Due to the labour-intense and risky production process resulting in relatively small amounts of wine, ice wines are generally quite expensive.

Canada and Germany are the world’s largest producers of ice wines. About 75 percent of the ice wine in Canada comes from Ontario.

Restauranter Michael Rubino Talks about Canadian Wines and Ice Wine Production

Christmas Wine Buying Guide

Ed Draves Manager at Prestige Wine and Spirits in Buffalo, New York

Ed Draves Manager at Prestige Wine and Spirits in Buffalo, New York

The big holiday meal.

And as anyone who has ever had the in-laws over for Christmas dinner can tell you, like gift giving, this meal, with all of the innumerable side dishes also comes with lots of expectations and tension.

In that spirit, hoping to lower your stress level a few notches, the Multi Cultural Cooking Network reached out to one of our good friends, Ed Draves, Wine Manager for Prestige Wine and Spirits in Buffalo, New York, where he has worked for over 20 years.

We asked Ed for a little advice on wine pairings and that Christmas meal.  Hopefully, with the suggested pairings below, you’ll be able to do a better job of getting the right wine for whatever you are planning on serving for the big meal.

Rather than ask for a specific wine or brand, we gave him a range of food items that might be served and asked him to think generally.  That way you can look for what is locally available to fit your meal.  With that, we think we’ve got you covered.

Here’s what Ed recommends to help you out.

The famous Rockwell Turkey Dinner… Look for champagne or a nice sparkling wine.  These will pair well with what typically tends to be a rather dry main course.

Pork loin… Look for a full bodied Pinot Noir or an Alsatian wine (pictured).  Remember, you are not trying to overpower your main course, but to complement it.  Both of these will fill that role.

Alsaltian Wine

Alsaltian Wine

Prime Rib… for many this is the boldest meal of the year so you want this done right.  For this main course look for a Bordeaux or a Meritage blend.  These darker wines will stand up well next to a nice cut of beef.

Christmas Ham… if you are going this route you need to be looking for a white Riesling or aGamay(pictured) if you are looking for a red.  Ed says both of these will do a great job alongside the more salty flavored ham.

shirazBut what if you are making the newest rage, the Turducken? In that case go for a full-bodied Shiraz.  There’s a lot of variety out there so get a young one that has some nice peppery hints.

And what should you do if you are avoiding meat products and maybe have that Tofurkey ready to go?  Ed says match your sides and remember, wine is a complementing beverage for your meal.

Finally, don’t forget about dessert.  If you want to top off a great meal right, get the classic, a Port wine.  Or, if you are lucky enough to live in the Northeast, try one of the local ice wines.  Both are perfect alongside the sweetness of your dessert.

So there you have it.  A quick how to guide on buying wine for whatever you may be serving come Christmas Day.

-Written by Dave Miller, World Traveling Missionary, Former Restaurant Manager and regular contributing writer for MCCN.

 

California- Monterey River Road Wine Trail -Valentine Passport Event

It is time for the sweetheart of all wine tastings! The 11 artisan vintners along Monterey’s River Road Wine Trail want to share the love! Receive a souvenir glass, entry into a grand drawing, special discounts, fun, food, and celebrate all things amour. Each winery will be hosting their own wine and food pairing, specifically to suit the love surrounding Valentine’s Day.

Click here to See Pricing, Participating Wineries and Website

Oak and Wine – A Brief History

Happy accidents-Sometimes something great happens by accident. Penicillin. A goal by Emile Heskey. Wine. When grapes are crushed together, in the right circumstances, an alcoholic fermentation will occur which will turn the sugar in the fruit into alcohol. It probably wouldn’t taste very nice, but it would be wine.
With this happy accident comes a problem: how do we best keep the wine? Two solutions were found, clay amphora and palm wood barrels. We don’t really know which came first but in the generations that followed, wood became increasingly popular to the point where clay was no longer used. Although both clay and wood solved the immediate problem of transportation and storage, it was felt that wood, in addition to storing the wine well, actually could improve the quality of the product.  READ MORE

A Little Red Wine Good for the Stomach

Many of us may have heard the Scriptural saying ” Stop drinking only water, and use a little wine because of your stomach and your frequent illnesses.”  Research shows that red wine can combat potentially-fatal food poisoning bugs.

E coli, Salmonella and Listeria are all susceptible to the effects of red wine, and Helicobacter pylori, a stomach ulcer-causing bug which is spread through food and drink, is particularly vulnerable.

The study, carried out at the University of Missouri in the US, showed that Cabernet, Zinfandel and Merlot are particularly effective in fighting food-borne bugs.

How to Choose Red Wines for Summer

One thing I recognize more immediately during the summer months is just how much red wine raises your temperature.  First of all it is typically served at room temp, not refrigerated or chilled in any way.  While at a party recently, the conversation went into a full blown red wine discussion.  Sometimes people have a hard time moving past the basic wine lesson of pairing red with meats and white with poultry. I applaud most for knowing the basics.     However, after the 101 course of wine knowledge there is a 102.  We’ve covered that before here on Multi Cultural Cooking Network (Click Here).

On this 100 degree day the host of party mentioned how more guests were opting for white wine. He seemed a bit surprised.  I said “Red wine raises your temperature. ”  He replied “…but red wine goes with meats.”   Then I added how despite all the wine snobs out there White Zinfandel and Rose are another way to go for summer picks.  Thus, after our conversation I knew I needed to dig deeper because people will continue feel the need for appearance sake to hold a glass of red wine or provide red wine because it looks more classy.  My suggestion for future hosts of parties, cookouts and other events comes with a little help from the  highly respected Gayot Guide.  They have some tips on Red wines which can be chilled.  When your guest looked shocked you can tell them with confidence what you know about the red wines defying the standard rules.  Moreover, you will look so smart in the process.  (Click Here For Chilled Red Wine Tips)

Written by Crystal A. Johnson, Multiculturalcookingnetwork.com Editor

Sparkling Wines of the World

Sparkling wine is a wine with significant levels of carbon dioxide in it making it fizzy. The carbon dioxide may result from natural fermentation, either in a bottle, as with the méthode champenoise, in a large tank designed to withstand the pressures involved (as in theCharmat process), or as a result of carbon dioxide injection.

Sparkling wine is usually white or rosé but there are many examples of red sparkling wines such as Italian Brachetto and Australian sparkling Shiraz. The sweetness of sparkling wine can range from very dry “brut” styles to sweeter “doux” varieties.

The classic example of a sparkling wine is Champagne, but many other examples are produced in other countries and regions, such as Espumante in Portugal, Cava in Spain,FranciacortaTrento and Asti in Italy (the generic Italian term for sparkling wine being Spumante) and Cap Classique in South Africa. In some parts of the world, the words “champagne” or “spumante” are used as a synonym for sparkling wine, although laws in Europe and other countries reserve the word Champagne for a specific type from the Champagne region of France. The French terms “Mousseux” or “Crémant” are used to refer to sparkling wine not made in the Champagne region. German and Austrian sparkling wines are called Sekt. The United States is a significant producer of sparkling wine: California in particular has seen French Champagne houses open wineries in the state to make American sparkling wine according to the Champagne method. Recently the United Kingdom, which produced some of the earliest examples of sparkling wine, has started producing Champagne-style wines again.