Aboriginal People of Canada Help to Kick off Olympics

When the Winter Olympic Ceremonies in Vancouver began it opened with reverence for history, a history  which begins with the Aboriginal People of Canada.

History

Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprise the First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The descriptors “Indian” and “Eskimo” are falling into disuse. Old Crow Flats and Bluefish Caves are the earliest archaeological sites of human habitation in Canada. The Paleo-Indian Clovis, Plano cultures and Pre-Dorset pre-date American indigenous and Inuit cultures. Projectile point tools, spears, pottery, bangles, chisels and scrapers mark archaeological sites, thus distinguishing cultural periods, traditions and lithic reduction styles. Hundreds of Aboriginal nations evolved trade, spiritual and social hierarchies. The Métis culture of mixed blood originated in the mid-17th century when First Nation and native Inuit married European settlers. The Inuit had more limited interaction with European settlers during that early period. Various laws, treaties, and legislation have been enacted between European immigrants and First Nations across Canada. Aboriginal Right to Self-Government provides opportunity to manage historical, cultural, political, health care and economic control aspects within first people’s communities.- Wikepedia

Inuit Hunter With Harpoon

Learn about Native Canadian Foods:

 http://multiculturalcookingnetwork.com/regions/north-america/item/407-native-canadian-foods.html

For More Great Opening Ceremonies Photos Visit UPI.com

Taylor Kitsch & Fitness: A Canadian Iron Man

Scene From Friday Night Lights

Canadian Taylor Kitsch melts a lot hearts as a fullback on NBC’s Friday Night Lights but his true athletic background is on the ice.  Born in Kelowna, British Columbia and raised in Vancouver, Kitsch is a former ice hockey player for Canadian BCHL.  He played for the Langley Hornets before a career ending knee injury.  Do you think Kitsch will be excited about the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver? We are guessing…yes. 

Fitness for Kitsch, did not stop with the injury or ending his role as an athlete on Friday Night Lights, the 28 year old never loss his devotion to fitness and health.  Before making it big, he became certified as a nutritionist and trainer.  His trade secrets to fitness is not really a secret.  Kitsch has gone on record to say, “displined eating and regular workouts.”  Moroever, he stays away from sugar and flour. 

He has graced the cover of Men’s Health and took time to discuss his support of fitness activities for kids.   Not just a man of words, Kitsch took part in the Nautica Malibu Triathlon which benefits the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

Read About fellow Canadian Ryan Reynolds in the MCCN Celebrity Fitness Section

Article by Crystal A. Johnson

Regional Foods of Canada

Canada is the country with the bragging rights of the 2010 Winter Olympic but Vancouver is the city of the golden opportunity to host the event.  MCCN will provide detailed Olympic Coverage about the City of Vancouver, where and what to eat.  As for the country as a whole, we thought it would help to recognize what food are more common in certain parts of Canada and the cultural influence.

Canadian cuisine varies widely from region to region. Generally, the traditional cuisine of English Canada is closely related to British and American cuisine, while the traditional cuisine of French Canada has evolved from French cuisine and the winter provisions of fur traders.

The basis of both groups is on seasonal, fresh ingredients and preserves. The cuisine includes a lot of baked foods, wild game, and gathered foods. Prepared foods were still a novelty for recent rural generations, so there are some that are well-loved to the point of obsession[citation needed] — and which have come to dominate suburban diets. However, home-made, warming, and wholesome remain key adjectives in what Canadians consider their cuisine.

The cuisine of the western provinces is heavily influenced by British, German, Ukrainian, Polish, and Scandinavian cuisine. Noteworthy is the cuisine of the Doukhobors, Russian-descended vegetarians.

Waterloo Region, Ontario has a tradition of Mennonite and Germanic cookery.

Canadian Chinese cuisine is widespread across the country, with variation from place to place. The Chinese smorgasbord, although found in the U.S. and other parts of Canada, had its origins in early Gastown, Vancouver, c.1870 and came out of the practice of the many Scandinavians‘ working in the woods and mills around the shantytown getting the Chinese cook to put out a steam table on a sideboard, so they could “load up” and leave room on the dining table (presumably for “drink”). Ginger beef is a popular Chinese food originating from Western Canada. (Ginger Beef in photo)

 

The traditional cuisine of The Arctic and the Canadian Territories is based on wild game and Inuit and First Nations cooking methods; conversely bannock, which is popular across First Nations and Native American communities throughout the continent, is a method for making pan-fried bread introduced to their culture by Scottish fur traders. The cuisines of Newfoundland and the Maritime provinces derive mainly from British and Irish cooking, with a preference for salt-cured fish, beef, and pork. Ontario, Manitoba & British Columbia also maintain strong British cuisine traditions.