Moqueca Brazilian Seafood Stew Recipe

Moqueca Image from Wikipedia Janaina Roberge

Moqueca is a Brazilian seafood stew. It is slowly cooked in a terracotta cassole. Moqueca can be made with shrimp or fish as a base with tomatoes, onions, garlic, lime and coriander. The name moqueca comes from the term mu’keka in Kimbundu language.

Recipe and Directions listed in a New York Times Article

Recipe from Casa de Tereza

Adapted by Florence Fabricant

FOR THE FAROFA (OPTIONAL):

  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 medium onion, sliced thin
  • 1 ½ cups manioc or cassava meal, available online and in some specialty food shops

FOR THE STEW:

  • 1 ¾ pounds black sea bass, filleted, trimmings reserved
  • 12 ounces large shrimp, peeled, shells reserved
  •  Salt
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 small white turnip, peeled and diced
  • 3 medium onions
  • 4 large plum tomatoes
  • 6 ounces shishito peppers, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  •  cup chopped cilantro
  • ¼ cup chopped chives
  • 1 green plantain
  • ½ red bell pepper, cut in rings
  • 2 green Cubanelle peppers, green frying peppers or 1 small green bell pepper, cut in rings
  • 10 ounces unsweetened coconut milk
  • 4 tablespoons dendê oil, or red palm oil, available online
  • 6 ounces cooked octopus tentacles, cut in thick slices, or raw squid in thin rings
  • 1 long red chile pepper, for garnish
  • ½ cup long grain rice, steamed
  •  Piri-piri or other hot sauce, for serving

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Brazilian Feijoada Recipe

Brazilian Feijoada

Thanks to a tip from a Brazillian woman that I met at Target who said I simply must have North east food listed on MCCN.

According to Wikipedia, Feijoada is a stew of beans with beef and pork, which is a typical Portuguese dish, also typical in Brazil, Angola and other former Portuguese colonies. In Brazil, feijoada is considered the national dish, which was brought to South America by the Portuguese, based in ancient Feijoada recipes from the Portuguese regions of Beira, Estremadura, and Trás-os-Montes.

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