USA: Meatloaf Recipe

The meatloaf has European origins; minced meat loaves were cooked already in the 5th century, and were mentioned in the famous Roman cookery collection “Apicius”.[2] Meatloaf is a traditional German, Belgian and Dutch dish, and it is a cousin to the Italian meatball. American meatloaf[3] has its origins in scrapple, a mixture of ground pork and cornmeal served by German-Americans in Pennsylvania since Colonial times.[3] However, meatloaf in the contemporary American sense did not appear in cookbooks until the late 19th century.- Wikepedia.  

Recipe below by MCCN Host Carla Crudup.

INGREDIENTS

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup onion, chopped

½ cup green bell pepper, chopped

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

11/2 lbs. lean ground beef

1/3 cup dried breadcrumbs

2 teaspoons dried italian seasoning

2 tablespoon ketchup

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)

1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce

1 egg

¼ cup grated cheese* (optional)

cooking spray

Sauce

½ cup ketchup

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 teaspoon mustard

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat.  Add onion, bell pepper and garlic and sauté for 2 minutes. Let cool.

In a large bowl combine, ground beef, onions, bell pepper, garlic and remaining ingredients and mix well. Transfer to 9 x 5 loaf pan coated with cooking spray.

Bake for approximately 45 minutes. In a small bowl mix sauce ingredients together.  Add sauce over meat and continue to

bake for an additional 5 minutes.  Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes.

*Feel free to use any type of cheese you like. As a suggestion, sharp cheddar, parmesan, romano and smoked cheeses work quite well with this meat loaf recipe.  Since Chef Jay invited me to his home and we are both passionate about european foods and cooking as well, I decided to use one of my favorites, the manchego cheese.  Manchego cheese is a spanish cheese made in the La Mancha region of Spain from the whole milk of sheep. The cheese is firm in texture, well developed and has a lovely distinctive flavor. It’s great to eat and pairs very well with a robust red wine or sherry.

Article and recipes Copyright © 2006 Carla Crudup. All Rights Reserved.
Watch Carla Make Meatloaf: 

Watch Carla in the Kitchen Making Meatloaf

Visit Carla’s website:  http://www.carlacrudup.com/

Carla Crudup Featured in Cuisine Noir Mag

MCCN’s Carla Crudup is becoming quite the buzz.  Her recipes are among our most popular from Meatloaf to Mac & Cheese.   Recently our perky hostess with the mostess was featured in Cuisine Noir Magazine.  READ ARTICLE We think she is a great find, Now find out why word is getting out about the phenomenal cooking talent.

How to Make Meatoaf by Carla Crudup

Carla Crudup grew up in a home infused with the passion for the culinary arts. Under the tutelage of two master chefs — namely, her mother and father — Carla was only 13 years old when she graduated from baking cookies and fruitcakes to preparing lobster and prime rib repasts for family and friends. As a Recipe Developer, Carla has an expertise in creating recipes and has done so for her award winning food column, major food manufacturers (Lender’s Bagels) and national grocery retail chains (Wild Oats which was purchased by Whole Foods market).  Read More About Carla Crudup.

MCCN Staff Talk Easter Food Traditions

Crystal Johnson, MCCN Editor– To the best of my recollection hot cross buns stand out for me.  They were sort of different and it never really dawned on me about the religious signifigance.  They were neat looking.  As for the taste, it was somewhere between a pastry and sweet bread.

Chef Jay Bonilla, En La Cocina Para Mi Amor- Host– In Honduras we don’t celebrate Easter as you do here, it is a time for reflection because it is when Jesus died, and Friday we eat dried fish soup because we are not supposed to eat meat.

Monica Johnson, MCCN Associate Editor– I don’t really have a favorite meal, but I do remember making Easter Eggs…boiling them, dying them and then decorating them was a lot of fun. Afterwards, I would put it in my big straw Easter basket. The thing I anticipated most was eating the big chocolate bunny that I got faithfully every year. I’m really thankful for those memories.

Micheal Fusco, MCCN Film Critic “Film and Foodie”-

My aunt makes an amazing potato, onion, and cheese casserole. We have it every year.

 
 
Sunni Boswell, Asian Express Host -Easter time was a time for traditional midwest feast of delicious glazed ham directly from a butcher.  Festooned with pineapple slices and cherries carefully arranged on the cross-hatched surface. All golden brown and soooo delicious. Decadant scalloped potatoes with three cheeses and onions, a crunchy delicious cucumber and onion salad and roasted tomatoes. Hardly Asian, but always delicious
and mouth watering. And, of course, a bowlful of colorful decorated Easter Eggs and chocolates!! As well as fresh cut flowers in crystal on table along with crisp linens.

 
 
 
Catrina K. Sally, MCCN Food History Managing Editor-Banana Pudding does that count as a dish? Whenever I made it I always ate more cookies than I put in the dish!
http://mywoodenspoon.com/grandmas-homemade-banana-pudding
 
 
 
 
 
 
Carla Crudup, Make Yourself Comfortable American Style- Host: I can remember smelling the buttery homemade yeast dinner rolls rising and baking, fresh green beans cooking and helping to make the potato salad. The glazed ham baking in the oven also brings backs great holiday memories that was garnished with cloves, brown sugar and pineapple.  We always had a second entree that was either prime rib, salmon or a rack of lamb. My mom was very diligent and passionate about decorating for the holidays and made easter baskets for everyone. I can recall the bunny napkin rings that graced the table that had been decorated with china and crystal. Pots of fresh lillies, daffodils and tulips were placed outside of the home… My parents always emphasized the reason for the celebration of Easter.
 
 
 
HAPPY EASTER!
 
 
 

Make Yourself Comfortable with MCCN Host Carla Crudup

Carla Crudup is the face behind that delicious home style mac & cheese.  The MCCN host of the New show Make Yourself Comfortable American Style is well traveled and billingual in Spanish and English so we are so happy to have her.  So watch the video and make yourself comfortable with Carla🙂

Carla’s Macaroni & Cheese Recipe

Recipe by Carla Crudup of Make Yourself Comfortable: Macaroni and cheese is a true food icon.  This legendary dish made its public debut in the United States in the early 1800s as it graced the table of President Thomas Jefferson, who served it in the White House.  A star was born, and the rest is history!  Today, macaroni and cheese is considered one of the classic American comfort foods. This recipe exemplifies the true essence of this popular dish. The spices and cheese blend highlight the wonderful taste of this American food prodigy. -Carla

Ingredients

  • 2 cups uncooked elbow macaroni
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon shallots, finely minced
  • ¼ cup flour
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg*
  • 2 ½ cups milk
  • 7 oz. grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • 2 oz. grated mozzarella cheese
  • non-stick cooking spray
  • paprika and dried parsley for garnish

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Cook macaroni in 4 quarts of boiling water until tender; drain and set aside.  In a large saucepan over medium low heat melt butter.  Add shallots and sauté 1 minute.  Add flour, salt, and peppers. Stir and cook until mixture is smooth and bubbly.  Gradually stir in milk and add nutmeg.  Cook on medium heat, stirring constantly until thick and smooth.  Reduce heat to low and stir in grated cheeses until melted. Add macaroni to cheese sauce and pour into cooking spray coated 3-quart casserole dish.  Garnish with paprika and parsley.  Bake uncovered for approximately 30 minutes or until bubbly.  Serves 6.

 *Substitute ground nutmeg if the fresh nutmeg seed is unavailable. But freshly grated nutmeg has a much more intense flavor. Nutmeg is commonly used in sweet or baked goods, but it is also fantastic in savory dishes such as this béchamel cheese sauce.  It is one of my favorite spices because of it’s versatility and subtleness that enhances the natural taste of any dish.

 Watch Carla talk about her passion for Nutmeg and Food: http://www.multiculturalcookingnetwork.com/videos/viewvideo/35/whats-the-dish/carlaintmov.html