Bangers & Mash History & Recipe

Bangers and mash

British dish made of mashed potatoes and sausages, the latter of which may be one of a variety of flavoured sausage made of pork or beef or a Cumberland sausage.

The dish is sometimes served with a rich onion gravy. It can also often be found served with fried onions.

This dish may, even when cooked at home, be thought of as an example of pub grub — relatively quick and easy to make in large quantities as well as being tasty and satisfying. More up-market varieties, with exotic sausages and mashes, are sold in gastropubs, as well as less exotic alternatives being available in regular public houses.

Along with jellied eels and pie and mash, the dish has particular iconic significance as traditional British working-class dishes.

Although it is sometimes stated that the term “bangers” has its origins in World War II, the term was actually in use at least as far back as 1919.[1] The term “bangers” is attributed to the fact that sausages, particularly the kind made during World War II under rationing, were made with water so they were more likely to explode under high heat if not cooked carefully; modern sausages do not have this attribute.

See Bangers and Mash Recipe: