Los Angeles: First Official Oktoberfest celebration

Chef Mairinger grew up at the Oktoberfests in his Austrian homeland – “It’s where I had my first beer –Oktoberfest Hat 2 (don’t ask how old I was).  I was also a champ at all the midway games and love the crazy hats.” 
Come celebrate Oktoberfest at BierBeisl Imbiss with traditional entertainment and authentic food and drink:  oversized beers, giant pretzel, pork shanks + spaetzle, beer flights, Austrian donuts, sweet and savory knoedels, sausages (of course) and more….all served on festive tables in The Spring Arcade, in the heart of downtown LA’s historic core.  Prizes for best lederhosen and best dirndl and best hat.
 
Date:  Saturday October 10 and Sunday October 11    Time:  11 am – 2 am
Tickets available thru EventBrite 
Ticket Price:  $30 includes entertainment, 10 oz beer, pretzel and official BierBeisl Oktoberfest T-Shirt.
Special donation tickets available to benefit Alex’s Lemonade Stand, an organization formed to fight childhood cancer.  For VIP ticket information and reservations, contactoffice@bierbeisl-imbiss.com
 

Germany: Pumpernickel History and Recipe

Pumpernickel (English pronunciation: /ˈpʌmpərnɪkəl/German: [ˈpʊmpɐˌnɪkəl]) is a typically heavy, slightly sweet rye bread traditionally made with coarsely ground rye.

Pumpernickel has been long associated with the Westphalia region of Germany, first referred to in print in 1450. Although it is not known whether this and other early references refer to precisely the bread that came to be known as Pumpernickel, Westphalian pumpernickel is distinguished by use of coarse rye flour—rye meal and a very long baking period, which gives the bread its characteristic dark color. Like most traditional all-rye breads, pumpernickel is traditionally made with an acidic sourdough starter, which preserves dough structure by counteracting highly active rye amylases. That method is sometimes augmented or replaced in commercial baking by adding citric acid or lactic acid along with commercial yeast.[1]

A slice of Polish malt colored pumpernickel

Traditional German Pumpernickel contains no coloring agents, instead relying on the Maillard reaction to produce its characteristic deep brown color, sweet, dark chocolate, coffee flavor, and earthy aroma. To achieve this, loaves are baked in long narrow lidded pans 16 to 24 hours in a low temperature (about 250°F or 120°C), steam-filled oven. Like the French pain de mie, Westphalian pumpernickel has little or no crust. It is very similar to rye Vollkornbrot, a dense rye bread with large amounts of whole grains added.

While true Pumpernickel is produced primarily in Germany, versions are popular in the Netherlands, under the name Roggebrood, where it has been a common part of the diet for centuries.

Click to See Rec ipe

History: Q & A About Oktoberfest

(Wikepedia)

How Did it originate?

The original “Oktoberfest” occurred in Munich, on October 18, 1810: For the commemoration of their marriage, Crown Prince Ludwig (later King Ludwig I) and Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen (namesake of the Theresienwiese festival grounds) organized a great horse race (the marriage took place on October 12; the horse race on October 17 — therefore, there are different dates named as being the first Oktoberfest).

Exactly when does it take place?

Oktoberfest is a 16-day festival held each year in Munich, Germany, running from late September to early October. It is one of the most famous events in Germany and the world’s largest fair, with some six million people attending every year, and is an important part of Bavarian culture. Other cities across the world also hold Oktoberfest celebrations, modeled after the Munich event.

The Munich Oktoberfest, traditionally, takes place during the sixteen days up to and including the first Sunday in October. In 1994, the schedule was modified in response to German reunification so that if the first Sunday in October falls on the 1st or 2nd, then the festival will go on until October 3 (German Unity Day). Thus, the festival is now 17 days when the 1st Sunday is October 2 and 18 days when it is October 1. The festival is held on an area named the Theresienwiese (field, or meadow, of Therese), often called d’ Wiesn for short.

Okay, So What about the Food?

oktoberfest food

Visitors also eat huge amounts of traditional hearty fare such as Hendl (chicken), Schweinsbraten (roast pork), Haxn (knuckle of pork), Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick), Würstel (sausages) along with Brezeln (Pretzel), Knödeln (potato or bread dumplings), Käsespätzle (cheese noodles), Reiberdatschi (potato pancakes), Sauerkraut or Rotkraut (red cabbage) along with such Bavarian delicacies as Obatzda (a fatty, spiced cheese-butter concoction) and Weisswurst (a white sausage).

 

For more about the history visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oktoberfest