Indonesian Coffee

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Indonesia, one of the world’s largest countries, is composed of thousands of islands. Several of the larger islands — Sumatra, Java and Sulawesi (or Celebes as it was called) — are known throughout the world for the fine, quality coffees which grow there. The coffee plant was introduced to Indonesia by Dutch colonists in the 17th century and soon led the world’s production. Today, small coffee farms of 1-2 acres predominate and most of it is dry processed. Indonesian coffees are noted for a pronounced rich, full body and mild acidity.

Indonesia is also known for its fine aged coffees. Traditionally, these were coffees held over a period of time by farmers who wanted to sell them at higher prices. Warehousing, it was found, gently aged the coffee in Indonesia’s warm, damp climate and resulted in an coffee prized for even deeper body and less acidity. It is a process which cannot been matched by technology.

Coffee around the World

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Coffee trees produce their best beans when grown at high altitudes in a tropical climate where there is rich soil.  Such conditions are found around the world in locations along the Equatorial zone, between latitudes 25 degrees North and 30 degrees South.

 

Besides location, other factors affect the quality and flavor of coffee. These include the variety of the plant, the chemistry of the soil in which it is grown, the weather, particularly the amount of rainfall and sunshine, and the precise altitude at which the coffee grows. Such variables — combined with the way the cherries are processed after being picked — contribute to the distinctions between coffees from countries, growing regions and plantations worldwide. The combination of factors is so complex, that even from a single plantation one finds variation in quality and taste.

Coffee is grown in more than 50 countries around the world. Here are just a few:

North America & The Caribbean

  • Hawaii – Kona Coffee is a world-renowned coffee that is exclusively grown on the slopes of two volcanoes on the Big Island. The porous and mineral rich volcanic soil combined with the often sunny mornings but cloudy or rainy afternoons, little wind, and mild nights give coffee from the Big Island a unique taste.
  • Mexico Mexico is one of the largest coffee-producing countries in the world, and the largest producer of organic coffee, accounting for 60% of world production in 2000. The vast majority of Mexican coffee, and particularly organic coffee, is grown by small farmers in the southern-most states of Chiapas and Oaxaca.  Try spiking with Mezcal, pair dark chocolate too.
  • Puerto Rico – Puerto Rican coffee is sweet and creamy, and experts suggest it is better enjoyed black and without sugar. The most common ways to drink coffee in Puerto Rico are pocillo (espresso), cortadito (espresso with a little steamed milk), and café con leche (latte).

Central America

  • Guatemala – Coffee in Guatemala is grown at an altitude of over 5,000 feet, which explains its robust and distinctive flavour. Guatemala’s unique growing region, with a mild subtropical climate, combined with nutrient-rich volcanic soil, create an ideal environment for growing some of the most delicious coffee beans in the market.
  • Costa Rica – Costa Rica has only two seasons: dry and a rainy season, both of which provide ideal coffee growing climates. … All of these factors affect the aroma, body, flavor, and acidity of the coffee we produce. The soil is enriched by volcanic ash, which oxygenates the beans, giving them richer flavors.
  • Honduras- If you typically don’t drink coffee black, this this is the coffee to change that. Honduran coffee is a rich Arabica bean that is typically wet processed. It is often used a good base for blending with other coffees but it is also sold as a single-origin coffee. When lightly roasted it features a delicate smooth texture with a slightly sweet taste.

South America

  • Colombia – Colombian coffee is often regarded as some of the highest quality coffee in the world. Colombia has traditionally grown arabica beans and its unique geography makes it perfectly suited for producing a delicious, high quality brew
  • Brazil – The best Brazilian coffee is soft, nutty, low acidity, and offers a nice bittersweet chocolate taste. Because of this, Brazilian coffee makes for an excellent base for making flavored coffees. A good Brazil coffee can add a lot to espresso blends too.

African & Middle East

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  • Kenya –
    Kenyan Coffee is One of the World’s Five Best Coffees
    With its rich body, high acidity, intense flavor, and delightful aroma, it should be no wonder. Kenyan coffee is known for its in-your-face acidity and berry undertones. One of those berry notes is black currant.
  • Ivory Coast – 
  • EthiopiaCoffee from Ethiopia is known for its bright fruited and floral flavors. These coffeestypically have a higher acidity, light to medium body and complex flavor notes. The beans are either washed or naturally processed. … These beans are characterized by their flavor clarity, showcasing bright, complex notes.

Asia

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  • Indonesia – Grown in volcanic ash, amongst chilis and spices, Indonesian coffees are prized for their unique, unmistakable flavors, velvety mouthfeel, and earthy tones.
  • Vietnam – Vietnamese coffee is known for its intense flavor and distinctive making process. French drip filter (called “phin” in Vietnamese) is what the locals use to make their coffee. … When coffee was first introduced to the country, fresh milk was not easy to find; hence the use of sweetened condensed milk.