Fusilli e Arugula Pignoli

Contributed by Michelle Karam

Luscious grains. Vibrant fruits and vegetables. Smooth velvety cheeses. Deep rich Olive Oils.  Sensory overload? No, just 2297950the abundant cuisine of the Mediterranean.  Not only is this cuisine a feast for your eyes and seriously delicious, but it turns out after all it’s provides those that follow it with some of the highest life expectancies around the world.  This is a lifestyle and a diet that provides all of the pleasures but none of the guilt!

So what exactly are the regions that this cuisine hails from? Traditionally it’s from Greece, but as it’s popularity has emerged you’ll find recipes from parts of Italy, Spain, Portugal, southern France and even Turkey, Morocco and the Middle East.

The warm sun, the fragrant sea, the azure sky… a taste of the Mediterranean. These recipes are a little bit of all of that. Now that’s a lifestyle that I wanna live.

 Ingredients

½ cup pignoli (or pine nuts)

4 cloves garlic

1 bunch arugula

1/3 cup olive oil

Coarse sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1 pound fusilli

Directions

 

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

 

In a skillet pan toast the pignoli nuts.  The nutty aroma from oils will begin to be released. Toast to a warm golden brown.

 

Then add pignoli nuts & garlic to the blender to form a paste.  Add the arugula and olive oil and pulse into the pignoli mixture.  The perfect texture you’re going to be looking for will be gritty and grainy, keeping the integrity of the pine nuts.

 

Add the fusilli to the water and cook until al dente.  Drain pasta and add Arugula Pignoli mixture and give it a stir to combine.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

The simplicity of this dish is perfectly Mediterranean all the while keeping that balance of healthy, astonishingly easy and fresh.

Italy: Panna Cotta History & Recipe

Panna cotta (from Italian cooked cream) is an Italian dessert made by simmering together cream, milk, and sugar, mixing this

Click here for Taste of Home Recipe for Panna Cotta.

with gelatin, and letting it cool until set. It is generally believed to have originated in the Northern Italian region of Piedmont,[1] although it is eaten all over Italy, where it is served with wild berries, caramel, chocolate sauce, or fruit coulis. It is not known exactly how or when this dessert came to be, but some theories suggest that cream, for which mountainous Northern Italy is famous, was historically eaten plain or sweetened with fruit or hazelnuts.

History of Tiramisu & Recipe

Tiramisu (Italian: tiramisù; Venetian: tiramesù [tirameˈsu]; literally “pick me up”) is a popular Italian cake. It is made of biscuits (usually savoiardi) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks and mascarpone, and flavored with liquor and cocoa.

There is some debate regarding tiramisu’s origin. It may have originated as a variation of another layered dessert, the Zuppa Inglese.

In 1998, Fernando and Tina Raris claimed that the dessert is a recent invention. They pointed out that while the recipes and histories of other layered desserts are very similar, the first documented mention of tiramisu in a published work appears in an article from 1971 by Giuseppe Di Clemente. It is mentioned in Giovanni Capnist’s 1983 cookbook I Dolci Del Veneto,whi le Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary gives 1982 as the first mention of the dessert.

Several sources (from Vin Veneto, dated 1981, to the Italian Academy of Giuseppe Maffioli and several cuisine websites) claim that tiramisu was invented in Treviso at Le Beccherie restaurant by the god-daughter and apprentice of confectioner Roberto Linguanotto, Francesca Valori, whose maiden name was Tiramisu. It is believed that Linguanotto named the dish in honour of Francesca’s culinary skill.

SEE RECIPE

Film and Foodie: Eat Pray and Love

The Film: Eat Pray & Love- Based on the best seller, Julia Roberts plays the main character of Liz, a lost miserable soul. Pretty early in the film she realizes that her marriage is not for her but she rebounds into the arms of the gorgeous James Franco, a younger man. However, he is not the answer. She comes to conclusion that she needs time to be single and figure some things out. First a few months of indulgent eating in Italy and then a quest for spirituality(balance).

Eat Pray and Love is entertaining but is does not quite live up to the hype. Richard Jenkins, James Franco and Javier Bardem are the brighter spots in the film.

The Foodie: Liz had to learn to let go and enjoy life. She decided to enjoy the pleasures of food its ok if muffin top happens. We watched Liz stuff her face in Italy with proscuitto and melon, pizza and chicken carbonara then prepare an American Thanksgiving dinner turkey. Then we watched her eat naan in India and down a Thumbs up soda with Richard Jenkins. In Bali, unfortunately, we did not get exposed to their cuisine. However, coffee and rice are cultivated there.

History of Gnocchi & Ancient Recipe

gnocchi_wideweb__470x383

 

 

Gnocchi (English pronunciation: /ˈnɒki/; Italian: [ˈɲɔkːi]; singular gnocco) is the Italian name for a variety of thick, soft noodle or dumpling. They may be made from semolina, ordinary wheat flour, potato, bread crumbs, or similar ingredients. The smaller forms are called gnocchetti.

The word gnocchi means “lumps”, and may derive from nocchio, a knot in the wood,[1] or from nocca (knuckle).[2] It has been a traditional Italian pasta type of probably Middle Eastern origin since Roman times.[3] It was introduced by the Roman Legions during the enormous expansion of the empire into the countries of the European continent. In the past 2000 years each country developed its own specific type of small dumplings, with the ancient Gnocchi as their common ancestor. In Roman times, gnocchi were made from a semolina porridge-like dough mixed with eggs, and are still found in similar forms today, particularly in Sardinia (where they do not contain egg, however, and are known as malloreddus).- Wikepedia

See this great link for recipe dating back to ancient recipe dating back to the 1300’s for gnocchi:  

Learn about Cavatelli: