Cannoli Cake Recipe

 

cannoli-cake_snappygourmet_lisa-huff

Recipe by Lisa Huff- Click to See Her Recipe

 

Growing up in New York, I am familiar with the cannoli culture so when a friend of mine pictured shared a photo of a cannoli cake, it a caught my attention.   I reposted it on our Multi Cultural Cooking Network page on Facebook.   And like after like, share after and saves happened.

Click Here to Enjoy checking out this recipe.

 

PAN FRIED ANGEL HAIR PASTA WITH SHRIMP

Image not by Chef Bonilla Image from http://www.biggirlssmallkitchen.com/

This Recipe is by Chef Jesus Bonilla

Ingredients

1 CUP TRADITIONAL FISH STOCK

3 TABLESPOONS EXTRA – VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

2 OUNCES MONKFISH, CUT INTO ¾ INCH CUBES

¼ POUND ANGEL HAIR PASTA BROKEN INTO 1 INCH PIECES

1 GARLIC CLOVE, PEELED AND VERY FINELY CHOPPED

3 TABLESPOONS SOFRITO

SALT TO TASTE

8 MEDIUM SHRIM, PEELED, DEVEINED AND CUT INTO ¾ INCH PIECES

¼ CUP ALLIOLI

Directions

Bring the stock to a boil in a small saucepan, once it boils, reduce the heat and maintain it at simmer.

In a medium flameproof casserole, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over high heat. Add the monkfish and sear on all sides, about 2 minutes. Remove the fish and set it aside.

Reduce the heat to medium – low, and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and the pasta. Pan fry , stirring it continuously with a wooden spoon, until the pasta has a golden brown color, about 10minutes. Be careful not to burn the pasta. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Then add the sofrito and raise the heat to medium pour in the hot stock and add salt to taste.

Add the shrimp and the seared monkfish pieces, and stir with a wooden spoon. You’ll see the pasta absorbing the liquid. Don’t touch the pan anymore. Cook for 6 minutes, until the liquid has evaporated.

Remove the pan from the heat and let the rossejat rest for 3 minutes.  Serve immediately with the allioli on the side.

Italy: History of Biscotti and How to Make It

Biscotti

mscotti.com-The word “Biscotti” comes from bis and cotti, the Italian terms for twice-cooked or twice-baked. Biscotti is also the generic term for cookie in Italian. Traditionally an Italian classic, Biscotti have been baked for centuries. It was the perfect food for sailors who were at sea for months at a time. The biscuits were thoroughly baked to draw out moisture, becoming a cracker-like food that was resistant to mold. Biscotti were a favorite of Christopher Columbus who relied on them on his long sea voyage.

 

Biscotti are eaten and enjoyed in many ways! Italians favor them as “dipping cookies” either in a delicious cup of coffee or cappuccino, or in a special Italian wine known as Vin Santo. They are enjoyed as a breakfast biscuit, dunked in coffee, along side a dish of Gelato or Spumoni, and of course, Biscotti are savored as a subtly sweet crispy snack all by themselves!

Authentic Godfather Spaghetti Meat Sauce Recipe Made Easy

Recently, I published my long await Best Foodie Film list here on the Multi Cultural Cooking Network Blog and on IMDB.  On LinkedIN’s Movie addicts page there was lots of feedback.  The Godfather and Godfather 3 have some fantastic foodie moments revolving around meatballs, sausage and gnocchi.  Francis Ford Coppola is definitely a foodie.  It creeps out with taking the time to do a cooking lesson by the character Clemenza and Michael Corleone in “The Godfather.”   Back then we didn’t realize he would start Coppola Winery.

Foodie Moment: Clemenza tells Michael:

Come over here, kid, learn something. You never know, you may have to cook for 20 guys some day. You see, you start out with a little bit of oil, you fry some garlic, then you throw in some tomatoes, some tomato paste, you fry it, you make sure it doesn’t stick, you get it to a boil. You shove in all your sausage and your meatballs, add a little bit of wine, and a little bit of sugar — and that’s my trick.

See the gnocchi scene in Godfather 3 (In Italian) 

Review of Recipes to Remember- An Italian Cookbook

Recipes to Remember is an engaging cookbook fueled by family love.  I strongly encourage readers to take the time to recipes-to-rememberread the section near the beginning of the book described as, “My epicurean journey.”  It will help the reader appreciate each recipe preserved by author Barbara Magro.    She is not afraid to invite you to sit at the table while she explains the character arc of her life, how she arrives at the creation of this cookbook.   Her subtitle says, “My epicurean journey to preserve my mother’s Italian cooking from Memory Loss.”  The title quickly grabbed my attention because I could relate to it.  When I step in the kitchen, especially for the holidays it helps me connect with family no matter how far I am and who has passed.  Stirring ingredients stirs up memories.  Sharing the recipes preserves tradition and history.  Magro recognized with beginning stages of her mother’s memory loss would go a huge part of her family’s history.  With a sense of urgency, Magro stepped up to the challenge of saving her family’s culinary legacy. When Magro did this for her family, she tapped into a helping other Italian families conjure up pieces of family memories and I believe it would help any family to be inspired to get in the kitchen with your relatives to understand the importance of culinary family traditions.

The vibrant mostly in color cookbook is filled with 100 classic Italian recipes from antipasti (appetizers) to holiday recipes.  I appreciate that Magro does not opt to merely lump certain dishes into the standard sections.  The holiday dishes are highlighted from Easter to Christmas.  Look forward to finding recipes for antipasto classic, pasta e fagioli, various sauces, polpettone(meatloaf),  sausage stuffing for turkey,  veal parmesan, zeppole, pizza rustica, biscotti de mandoria(almond biscotti) and more.    If you have ever desired to learn more about Italian cooking starting with the cookbook of classics is a great way to start.  Seeing how the holiday recipes are grouped together is an excellent shortcut way to learn about Italian culinary traditions.

Most people do not pick up a cookbook to read a biography; however, this cookbook includes a compelling inspired story of creation. This book has one key ingredient many other cookbooks miss…soul.  It should be a gift to yourself and to put in someone’s culinary library.   A portion of the proceeds from Recipes to Remember benefits the Alzheimer’s Association.

Caprese Salad Recipe

Insalata Caprese (salad in the style of Capri) is a simple salad from the Italian region of Campania, made of sliced fresh buffalo mozzarella, tomatoes and basil, seasoned with salt, and olive oil. In Italy, unlike most salads, it is usually served as an antipasto (starter), not a contorno (side dish)

See this recipe from Living Eventfully

Ingredients

  • 1 large package of cherry tomatoes
  • 8-10 sticks of mozzarella string cheese or 1 container pearl sized buffalo mozzarella
  • 1 bunch of fresh basil
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Balsamic vinegar

Click to See Directions

Chef Kate’s Sausage Artichoke Orecchiette Recipe

Kate Ferrara Homes grew up in coastal Connecticut; in an Italian- Irish family with parents who loved to get the kids involved in the kitchen and expose them to all sorts of dining experiences. The Ferrara family loved to eat, and between the summertime spreads of peasant bread, gazpacho soup, summer sausage and smoked mozzarella, to the Sunday afternoon southern Italian feasts at her grandparents’ house, they were never for want of fun food extravaganzas.  With her enthusiam for Italian cooking she brings this recipe to you. CLICK TO SEE RECIPE

History of Tiramisu & Recipe

Tiramisu (Italian: tiramisù; Venetian: tiramesù [tirameˈsu]; literally “pick me up”) is a popular Italian cake. It is made of biscuits (usually savoiardi) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks and mascarpone, and flavored with liquor and cocoa.

There is some debate regarding tiramisu’s origin. It may have originated as a variation of another layered dessert, the Zuppa Inglese.

In 1998, Fernando and Tina Raris claimed that the dessert is a recent invention. They pointed out that while the recipes and histories of other layered desserts are very similar, the first documented mention of tiramisu in a published work appears in an article from 1971 by Giuseppe Di Clemente. It is mentioned in Giovanni Capnist’s 1983 cookbook I Dolci Del Veneto,whi le Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary gives 1982 as the first mention of the dessert.

Several sources (from Vin Veneto, dated 1981, to the Italian Academy of Giuseppe Maffioli and several cuisine websites) claim that tiramisu was invented in Treviso at Le Beccherie restaurant by the god-daughter and apprentice of confectioner Roberto Linguanotto, Francesca Valori, whose maiden name was Tiramisu. It is believed that Linguanotto named the dish in honour of Francesca’s culinary skill.

SEE RECIPE

Chef Kate’s Grilled Kale Caesar Salad w/Canellini Beans

Chef Kate Homes at Farmer’s Market

Besides being a master chef, Kate Ferrara Homes knows thing or two about how make Italian food healthy.  Run off to the farmer’s market if you can to gather your produce for this amazing recipe. Chef Kate recalls fondly gathering around the dinner table as a child growing up in an Italian family. One of the ways to set the tone for dinner is appetizing salad.  Try this salad which burst with the flavors of Italy.

Ingredients

  • 1 lg bunch kale- washed thoroughly and removed from stems
  • 1T olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 6 white anchovies, rough chopped
  • ¼ c grated parmesan
  • juice of 1-2 lemons
  • 1T Dijon mustard
  • 1tsp chopped parsley
  • ½ t salt
  • fresh ground pepper
  • 2T olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pinch crushed red pepper
  • 1 can canellini beans- drained
  • 4 slices of crusty bread brushed with oil salt and pepper

 

Method
Fire up the grill on med/high. In a large bowl, toss kale with oil and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Reserve.

 

In a separate bowl, combine juice of one lemon and Dijon, stir in anchovies, parmesan, parsley, salt and pepper

 

Heat 2 T olive oil in a med skillet over low heat. Gently sweat garlic and crushed red pepper until soft and fragrant, but not browned. Add in drained beans, stir over low until heated through.

 

Grill Kale 1 min per side. It should be wilted with charred bits. Transfer to a cutting board and rough chop. Grill bread as well. Stir the bean and garlic mixture into the rest of the dressing, taste for seasoning and add more lemon if necessary. Toss in a large bowl with Kale. Serve with grilled bread.

 

Recipe by MCCN Contributing Chef Kate of Carried Away Catering