Django Unchained Evokes Black History Knowledge and Discussion

It is a bloody means to an end but I am glad I took the journey to see Django Unchained. As a fan of Tarantino’s work it is a must see.  The Black Film Critics cirlce has given a thumbs up to film.  Despite the torturous unending use of the word, nigger and the gore fest of blood and guts, Tarantino provides a meaningful way of entertainment.  Over the years, many African American have grown weary of watching stories of slaves a powerless victims.  However, painful it a truth many don’t like to visit.  The fictious tale of  Django presents a plausible power shift carefuly wrapped in legal technicalities to drive the story.

One of the more poignant aspects of the film includes history.  The violent world of Black slaves wrestling is a reality of history and of image of a Black man during slavery times riding a horse is featured.  I reasoned with myself what would the issue be of a Black man riding on a horse be.  I have rationalized that it may been his ability to look down at whites.  According the Chapman University’s Historical Review,  “Slave owners kept the horses in closed locations because if slaves were able to steal the horses they could quickly escape from the plantations. Due to these reasons, horseracing was limited. Horsemanship was also the mark of a gentleman.”    The Chapman University Historical Review has a great article worth reading entitled, Sports in Shackles: The Athletic and Recreational habits of slaves on Southern plantations.  READ MORE

Written by Crystal A. Johnson

See Film and Foodie Review of Django Unchained