Easter all Around the World

Blessing of Easter Food in Poland

Blessing of Easter Food in Poland

Easter is celebrated all around the world, whether it is celebrated with a big family dinner, religious parade, or hunting for Easter eggs. Different countries celebrate Easter in their own way. In this article the four countries that will be highlighted are Brazil, Russia, Egypt, and France. These four countries all celebrate Easter through games, religious activities, and food.

 

In Brazil Easter is known as Pa’scoa. The beginning of Pa’scoa celebrationstarts off with Semana Santa (Holy week). During Holy week, processionals are in full swing, banners and signs are made to celebrate Mary and the body of Jesus. During the processional, pacoca is handed out to all the visitors. Pacoca is like a candy, which is made from a mixture of crushed nuts and sugar made into a paste. On Good Friday

Paoca

Paoca

bacalhau is made and eaten. Bacalhau is dried and salted cod; this piece of fish is traditionally eaten on holidays.

Easter in Russian is celebrated in different religions but food is the main attraction.  In Russian kulich is made in celebration of Easter and is eaten 40 days after Easter. Kulich is a tall and narrow bread made from butter, eggs, candied fruit, raisins, and nuts. Kulich is usually iced on top like a cake and decorated. Usually served with kulich, paskha is a Russian cheesecake made from curd cheeses and is formed in the shape of a pyramid. Many dishes are made in Russian in celebration of Easter including beet salads, lapsha soup,ham in the dough, and dranikl (potato pancake).

(Russian Kulich)

Brazil and Russia are not the only ones that celebrate Easter, Egypt bakes up it’s own traditional Easter meals too.  In Egypt the Easter celebration begins with Sham el Nessin that is translated as “smelling of the breeze”. The Sham el Nessin celebrations run into the Easter celebration. During the celebrations certain foods are consumed such as slated fish, onions, beans, lettuce, and colored eggs. The main attraction of the celebrations is the baked breads. The baked bread that is very traditional is Armenian Choreg, which is sweet bread. Armenian Choreg has a secret ingredient and that is mahleb, which are ground sour cherry pits. This bread takes patients to make but the pay off of its sweet taste is rewarding enough.

kulich

kulich

France is the mother land of Culinary greatness, and in France Easter showcases that. In France after the child have played all the Easter egg games and have gone to church it then would be time for the Easter meal. The traditional Easter meal in France would consist of several courses, which are accompanied by wine, cheese, and dessert. The main course would be a braised, herb rubbed rack of lamb. After the main course a smaller more delicate course would be served such as a salad. Following that course, cheeses and baguettes would be shared around and then a delightful chocolate dessert. Speaking of chocolate, Easter eggs in France aren’t plastic they are chocolate made by chocolatiers and patissiers.

So as we can see Easter is celebrated all around the world just in different flavors. Brazil, Russia, Egypt, and France all celebrate Easter but some eat salted fish, tall narrow breads, sweet breads made with sour cherry pit, and make chocolate eggs. Once again we see that food can bring people together no matter what the occasion is, so get in touch with you heritage and celebrate this Easter with a traditional meal.

 

Work Cited

  • Abissada. “The Egyptian Kitchen.” : Sham El Nessim / Easter: Armenian Choreg (brioche). N.p., 22 Apr. 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Brazilian Easter from Around the World at EasterBunny’s.Net.” Brazilian Easter from Around the World at EasterBunny’s.Net. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Easter Traditional Food from Around the World.” Easter Traditional Food from Around the World. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Flavors of Brazil: The Foods of Easter in Brazil – Salt Cod (Bacalhau).” Flavors of Brazil: The Foods of Easter in Brazil – Salt Cod (Bacalhau). N.p., 25 Mar. 2010. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • Hanson, Rachel. “How Do the French Celebrate Easter.” LoveToKnow. M.A. French, n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • Kubilius, Kerry. “Easter In Russia.” About.com Eastern Europe Travel. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • Laurena. “Easter in Brazil.” Portuguese Blog. N.p., 8 Apr. 2012. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  • “Traditional Russian Easter Foods.” The Hungarian Girl. N.p., 9 Mar. 2010. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
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The History of Marshmallow PEEPS

Bright, spongy, and sweet marshmallow PEEPS are iconic Easter season candies. The poultry shaped treats can be traced back to the 1910 Just

Pink PEEPS Jon Sullivan - Pdphoto.org

Pink PEEPS Jon Sullivan – Pdphoto.org

Born Candy tradition.

Sam Born emigrated from Russia to the United States in 1910. A skilled candy maker and inventor, Born employed innovative technology to create chocolate sprinkles, the hard chocolate coating for ice cream bars, and a machine that mechanically inserted sticks into lollipops.

In 1923 Brooklyn, New York Born opened his first candy company. In an effort to alert his customers to his products’ freshness, Born daily placed a “Just Born” sign in the company’s window. The name stuck and the Just Born Company was, ahem born.

In 1932 the thriving company moved to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. In 1953 Born acquired the Rodda Candy Company and with it the iconic PEEPS. Ever the innovative company, Just Born invented a way to mass produce the PEEPS and the company became the world’s largest manufacturer of novelty marshmallow treats.

Not just regulated to yellow baby chickens, PEEPS come in different shapes and colors for all holidays!

The Just Born Company is also responsible for the Mike and Ike, Hot Tamales, and Peanut Chew candy treats.

The Just Born Company

Written by Catrina Sally

Hot Cross Buns Recipe

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I have fond memories of hot cross buns. My grandma would make them. In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion. (Read History)

 

Ingredients

Buns

 

1/4 cup apple juice or rum
1/2 cup mixed dried fruit
1/2 cup raisins or dried currants
1 1/4 cups milk, room temperature
3 large eggs, 1 separated
6 tablespoons butter, room temperature
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1/4 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves or allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 3/4 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
4 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

Topping

1 large egg white, reserved from above
1 tablespoon milk

Icing

1 cup + 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt
4 teaspoons milk, or enough to make a thick, pipeable icing

1) Lightly grease a 10″ square pan or 9″ x 13″ pan.

2) Mix the rum or apple juice with the dried fruit and raisins, cover with plastic wrap, and microwave briefly, just till the fruit and liquid are very warm, and the plastic starts to “shrink wrap” itself over the top of the bowl. Set aside to cool to room temperature. Note: If you worry about using plastic wrap in your microwave, simply cover the bowl with a glass lid.

3) When the fruit is cool, mix together all of the dough ingredients except the fruit, and knead, using an electric mixer or bread machine, till the dough is soft and elastic. Mix in the fruit and any liquid not absorbed.

4) Let the dough rise for 1 hour, covered. It should become puffy, though may not double in bulk.

5) Divide the dough into billiard ball-sized pieces, about 3 3/4 ounces each. A heaped muffin scoop (about 1/3 cup) makes about the right portion. You’ll make 12 to 14 buns. Use your greased hands to round them into balls. Arrange them in the prepared pan.

6) Cover the pan, and let the buns rise for 1 hour, or until they’ve puffed up and are touching one another. While the dough is rising, preheat the oven to 375°F.

7) Whisk together the reserved egg white and milk, and brush it over the buns.

8) Bake the buns for 20 minutes, until they’re golden brown. Remove from the oven, and transfer to a rack to cool.

9) Mix together the icing ingredients, and when the buns are completely cool, pipe it in a cross shape atop each bun.

Recipe from Kingarthurflour.com

The Origins of the Easter Bunny

The Easter Bunny hopped its way into holiday lore during the 1500’s. The concept of the Easter Bunny was first observed in 15th century German text and the first edible Easter bunnies were created from pastry and sugar in 18th century Germany.

17th century German settlers introduced the Easter Bunny to America. The bunny or “Oschter Haws” was rumored to give well behaved children colorful eggs.

In preparation for the bunny visit, children created nests for the eggs out of caps and bonnets. The children would then hide the nests around their home and wait for the bunny to lay its eggs. Through the years, the creation of nests became more elaborate and has evolved into the Easter Baskets we see today.

check out Easterbunnys.net for more Easter Bunny Facts!

See Easter Recipes and Ideas

Spring: Setting the Table

This Easter I had the opportunity to dine at a home where there was a beatiful festival table setting of pink and green.  Fresh flowers lined the table.  I cannot stress how wonderful it is to gather for dinner at a set table with family and friends.

Notice the festive accents of chocolate bunnies at each setting for the guests.

Italian Style Asparagus

MCCN Quick Reference Holiday Sides Recipe Guide(American)

MCCN Editor’s Original Recipe- White Zinfandel Cranberry Sauce-Smashing, different tasty.  Our recipe for cranberry sauce is one of the most searched.

Southern Style Collard Greens – We have a few suggestions on how to prepare this favorite holiday side dish.

Macaroni & Cheese– MCCN’s Carla Crudup is a master at creating recipes.  Her recipes have been on major brands such as Lender’s bagels.  This recipe is among our most popular.

Cornbread Chorizo Stuffing–  I make this and it seems to be a show stopper.  Although the recipe can be easily searched the idea of it is slowly and steadily growing in popularity.

MCCN Staff Talk Easter Food Traditions

Crystal Johnson, MCCN Editor– To the best of my recollection hot cross buns stand out for me.  They were sort of different and it never really dawned on me about the religious signifigance.  They were neat looking.  As for the taste, it was somewhere between a pastry and sweet bread.

Chef Jay Bonilla, En La Cocina Para Mi Amor- Host– In Honduras we don’t celebrate Easter as you do here, it is a time for reflection because it is when Jesus died, and Friday we eat dried fish soup because we are not supposed to eat meat.

Monica Johnson, MCCN Associate Editor– I don’t really have a favorite meal, but I do remember making Easter Eggs…boiling them, dying them and then decorating them was a lot of fun. Afterwards, I would put it in my big straw Easter basket. The thing I anticipated most was eating the big chocolate bunny that I got faithfully every year. I’m really thankful for those memories.

Micheal Fusco, MCCN Film Critic “Film and Foodie”-

My aunt makes an amazing potato, onion, and cheese casserole. We have it every year.

 
 
Sunni Boswell, Asian Express Host -Easter time was a time for traditional midwest feast of delicious glazed ham directly from a butcher.  Festooned with pineapple slices and cherries carefully arranged on the cross-hatched surface. All golden brown and soooo delicious. Decadant scalloped potatoes with three cheeses and onions, a crunchy delicious cucumber and onion salad and roasted tomatoes. Hardly Asian, but always delicious
and mouth watering. And, of course, a bowlful of colorful decorated Easter Eggs and chocolates!! As well as fresh cut flowers in crystal on table along with crisp linens.

 
 
 
Catrina K. Sally, MCCN Food History Managing Editor-Banana Pudding does that count as a dish? Whenever I made it I always ate more cookies than I put in the dish!
http://mywoodenspoon.com/grandmas-homemade-banana-pudding
 
 
 
 
 
 
Carla Crudup, Make Yourself Comfortable American Style- Host: I can remember smelling the buttery homemade yeast dinner rolls rising and baking, fresh green beans cooking and helping to make the potato salad. The glazed ham baking in the oven also brings backs great holiday memories that was garnished with cloves, brown sugar and pineapple.  We always had a second entree that was either prime rib, salmon or a rack of lamb. My mom was very diligent and passionate about decorating for the holidays and made easter baskets for everyone. I can recall the bunny napkin rings that graced the table that had been decorated with china and crystal. Pots of fresh lillies, daffodils and tulips were placed outside of the home… My parents always emphasized the reason for the celebration of Easter.
 
 
 
HAPPY EASTER!
 
 
 

Decorative Chocolate Truffle Filled Eggs

It happened one day as I was twittering and following that I stumble upon chocolate.com.  What caught my eyes were these eggs which almost looked like Easter eggs but have a different spin to them.  They are available as customized decorative eggs for St. Patrick’s Day, Mother’s Day, the Fourth of July or just about any event. 

The most confounding part  is the chocolate is actually in a real egg shell.  Wrap you brain around that then refrigerate for 15 minutes, whack, peel and enjoy.  My egg had a smooth chocolate peanut butter flavor.  This could be a great party favor – Crystal Johnson, MCCN Editor and Food Critic

Visit them online at: http://www.chocolate.com/brands/the-sweetique-llc/