PAN FRIED ANGEL HAIR PASTA WITH SHRIMP

Image not by Chef Bonilla Image from http://www.biggirlssmallkitchen.com/

This Recipe is by Chef Jesus Bonilla

Ingredients

1 CUP TRADITIONAL FISH STOCK

3 TABLESPOONS EXTRA – VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

2 OUNCES MONKFISH, CUT INTO ¾ INCH CUBES

¼ POUND ANGEL HAIR PASTA BROKEN INTO 1 INCH PIECES

1 GARLIC CLOVE, PEELED AND VERY FINELY CHOPPED

3 TABLESPOONS SOFRITO

SALT TO TASTE

8 MEDIUM SHRIM, PEELED, DEVEINED AND CUT INTO ¾ INCH PIECES

¼ CUP ALLIOLI

Directions

Bring the stock to a boil in a small saucepan, once it boils, reduce the heat and maintain it at simmer.

In a medium flameproof casserole, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over high heat. Add the monkfish and sear on all sides, about 2 minutes. Remove the fish and set it aside.

Reduce the heat to medium – low, and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and the pasta. Pan fry , stirring it continuously with a wooden spoon, until the pasta has a golden brown color, about 10minutes. Be careful not to burn the pasta. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Then add the sofrito and raise the heat to medium pour in the hot stock and add salt to taste.

Add the shrimp and the seared monkfish pieces, and stir with a wooden spoon. You’ll see the pasta absorbing the liquid. Don’t touch the pan anymore. Cook for 6 minutes, until the liquid has evaporated.

Remove the pan from the heat and let the rossejat rest for 3 minutes.  Serve immediately with the allioli on the side.

Baked Penne with Eggplant Pasta alla Norma

In honor of MCCN’s Anniversary Mario Batali has provided his favorite recipe for Baked Penne with Eggplant Pasta baked-penne-with-eggplant1-300x225alla Norma. Recipe courtesy of Mario’s book: Molto Italiano (ecco 2005)

The success of this dish relies on the quality of the eggplant. Older, larger eggplant tend to hold bigger seed pockets and can be bitter, so look for small- to medium-sized eggplants, of any variety. If you cannot find ricotta salata, try a young pecorino or provolone.

Makes 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 Pounds small to medium eggplant, cut into ¼-inch-thick slices Salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  • 6 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 Pound penne
  • 2 Cups Basic Tomato Sauce (see below)
  • 1 Cup Toasted bread crumbs
  • ½ Cup freshly grated pecorino romano
  • An 8-ounce of ricotta salata, for grating

DIRECTIONS

Bring 6 quarts of water to a boil in a large pot, and add 2 tablespoons salt.

Meanwhile, in a 10- to 12-inch sauté pan, heat 3 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat until almost smoking.

Working in batches, sauté the eggplant slices, seasoning them with salt and pepper, turning once, until golden brown on both sides.

Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels to drain.

Preheat the oven to 375° F.

Grease a 9-by-12-inch baking dish with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil.

Cook the penne in the boiling water for 2 minutes short of the package instructions; it should still be quite firm.

Drain and rinse under cold water until cool. Drain very well, place in a large bowl, and toss with 1 cup of the tomato sauce.

Cover the bottom of the baking dish with ¼ cup of the tomato sauce. Top with half the bread crumbs, then add half the pasta.

Arrange half of the eggplant slices, overlapping them slightly, on top of the pasta.

Dot about ¼ cup of tomato sauce over the eggplant, and top with half of the pecorino and half of the basil.

Top with the remaining pasta, arrange the remaining eggplant over the pasta, and dot with the remaining tomato sauce.

Sprinkle with the remaining pecorino and basil, and then the remaining bread crumbs, and drizzle with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil.

Bake for 45 minutes. Let rest for 10 minutes before servings.

Place a generous portion of pasta on each plate, grate ricotta salata over, and serve.

Basic Tomato Sauce Recipe courtesy of Molto Italiano (ecco 2005)

INGREDIENTS

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 Spanish onion, cut into ¼-inch dice.
  • 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • ½ medium carrot, finely shredded
  • Two 28-ounce cans whole tomatoes.
  • Salt

Makes 4 cups DIRECTIONS

In a 3-quart saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat.

Add the onion and garlic and cook until soft and light golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes.

Add the thyme and carrot and cook until the carrot is quite soft, about 5 minutes.

Add the tomatoes, with their juice, and bring to a boil, stirring often.

Lower the heat and simmer until as thick as hot cereal, about 30 minutes.

Season with salt.

The sauce can be refrigerated for up to 1 week or frozen for 6 months.

Italy: Panna Cotta History & Recipe

Panna cotta (from Italian cooked cream) is an Italian dessert made by simmering together cream, milk, and sugar, mixing this

Click here for Taste of Home Recipe for Panna Cotta.

with gelatin, and letting it cool until set. It is generally believed to have originated in the Northern Italian region of Piedmont,[1] although it is eaten all over Italy, where it is served with wild berries, caramel, chocolate sauce, or fruit coulis. It is not known exactly how or when this dessert came to be, but some theories suggest that cream, for which mountainous Northern Italy is famous, was historically eaten plain or sweetened with fruit or hazelnuts.

Italy: History of Biscotti and How to Make It

Biscotti

mscotti.com-The word “Biscotti” comes from bis and cotti, the Italian terms for twice-cooked or twice-baked. Biscotti is also the generic term for cookie in Italian. Traditionally an Italian classic, Biscotti have been baked for centuries. It was the perfect food for sailors who were at sea for months at a time. The biscuits were thoroughly baked to draw out moisture, becoming a cracker-like food that was resistant to mold. Biscotti were a favorite of Christopher Columbus who relied on them on his long sea voyage.

 

Biscotti are eaten and enjoyed in many ways! Italians favor them as “dipping cookies” either in a delicious cup of coffee or cappuccino, or in a special Italian wine known as Vin Santo. They are enjoyed as a breakfast biscuit, dunked in coffee, along side a dish of Gelato or Spumoni, and of course, Biscotti are savored as a subtly sweet crispy snack all by themselves!

Authentic Godfather Spaghetti Meat Sauce Recipe Made Easy

Recently, I published my long await Best Foodie Film list here on the Multi Cultural Cooking Network Blog and on IMDB.  On LinkedIN’s Movie addicts page there was lots of feedback.  The Godfather and Godfather 3 have some fantastic foodie moments revolving around meatballs, sausage and gnocchi.  Francis Ford Coppola is definitely a foodie.  It creeps out with taking the time to do a cooking lesson by the character Clemenza and Michael Corleone in “The Godfather.”   Back then we didn’t realize he would start Coppola Winery.

Foodie Moment: Clemenza tells Michael:

Come over here, kid, learn something. You never know, you may have to cook for 20 guys some day. You see, you start out with a little bit of oil, you fry some garlic, then you throw in some tomatoes, some tomato paste, you fry it, you make sure it doesn’t stick, you get it to a boil. You shove in all your sausage and your meatballs, add a little bit of wine, and a little bit of sugar — and that’s my trick.

See the gnocchi scene in Godfather 3 (In Italian) 

Caprese Salad Recipe

Insalata Caprese (salad in the style of Capri) is a simple salad from the Italian region of Campania, made of sliced fresh buffalo mozzarella, tomatoes and basil, seasoned with salt, and olive oil. In Italy, unlike most salads, it is usually served as an antipasto (starter), not a contorno (side dish)

See this recipe from Living Eventfully

Ingredients

  • 1 large package of cherry tomatoes
  • 8-10 sticks of mozzarella string cheese or 1 container pearl sized buffalo mozzarella
  • 1 bunch of fresh basil
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Balsamic vinegar

Click to See Directions

Feast of San Gennaro- Hollywood 2012

Zeppolle

The Feast of the San Genarro, technically called The Galbani®Cheese Italian Feast of San Gennaro is set up well with a long aisle of Italian foods, drinks and items displaying Italian pride for purchase.  The vendors were a bit aggressive, the prices a wee bit high but a great  cultural culinary addition to landscape of  Los Angeles.   There was no shortage of red, white and green colors of the Italian flag,  bocce playing and bingo.  The event really had a family oriented feel complete with ferris wheel, a few other rides and a kids korner.  However, the crowd seemed to be rather small.  It was probably the fallout of Carmageddon weekend.

Although I am not Italian, I am a New Yorker exposed to some of the Italian culinary experience via New York.  Yes, to my delight there was Italian Ice but priced at $5.00 a cup full.  If you are from New York this is pricey to us but I must admit the cup was two times what you usually get in NYC.  Familiar food finds included gelato, pizzas, cannolis,  and also to my delight zepolles.

Cannoli from vendor

We spotted the former contestants from the Great Food Truck Race, Nonna’s Kitchenette and interviewed them.  See Interview and food moments from the fest.

An Italian American Thanksgiving

The United States has a rich history of immigrants.  With each decade we can continue a culture of people born to immigrant parents.  This article takes a back to an Italian American story.  What I especially love about it is organic fusion various cultures bring to the table of their hyphenated American experience.- Crystal Johnson, MCCN Editor

Excerpt from Memories of Italian American Thanksgiving

The women would prepare every conceivable dish that would depict the tradition of Thanksgiving. Many of them had never fixed a turkey or made gravy for the turkey. Some of the dishes, like mashed potatoes and stuffing, would have Italian seasonings added such as Parmesan cheese, mozzarella cheese and homemade Italian sausage. You can see my Mom’s Italian Style Turkey Stuffing Recipe.


The meal would start with Antipasto (Italian appetizer), which is a salad mixture of Italian salami, cheeses, ham, artichokes, mushrooms served with a vinaigrette dressing. Because some of the older men in the family missed their Italian meals, the women would even fix a pasta dish with meat sauce and meatballs and then we would start on “the turkey meal”.

Read More

Chef Kate’s Sausage Artichoke Orecchiette Recipe

Kate Ferrara Homes grew up in coastal Connecticut; in an Italian- Irish family with parents who loved to get the kids involved in the kitchen and expose them to all sorts of dining experiences. The Ferrara family loved to eat, and between the summertime spreads of peasant bread, gazpacho soup, summer sausage and smoked mozzarella, to the Sunday afternoon southern Italian feasts at her grandparents’ house, they were never for want of fun food extravaganzas.  With her enthusiam for Italian cooking she brings this recipe to you. CLICK TO SEE RECIPE

Italy: Polenta

Over the course of the next few days, Venice, Italy will be lit with food, entertainment, culture and tradition as Italians celebrate Venice Carnival. Although most of us won’t be able to travel there, we can certainly get a taste of Italy right at home.  Here are some interesting facts about a traditional Italian dish that is tasty and easy to prepare:

Made from grain cooked in water, Polenta served as a Pre-Columbian Northern Italy staple. Sometimes made from chick-peas or chestnut grain, the porridge-like substance is also known as “Italian Grits.” READ MORE